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Frozen in time: Inside Eritrea's embassy

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image copyrightKalkidan Yibeltal/BBC
image captionThis furniture was used by the last Eritrean ambassador to Ethiopia two decades ago

Dust-covered furniture, cars and even beer bottles have been revealed as Eritrea officially opens its embassy's doors in Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, for the first time since 1998, when the two countries went to war.

It is part of the ongoing rapprochement between the two countries, who have only recently agreed to restore diplomatic ties, even though the conflict ended in 2000.

These photos were taken inside the embassy by the BBC.

image copyrightKalkidan Yibeltal/BBC
image captionThese cars have been kept in storage at the embassy compound in Addis Ababa.
image copyrightKalkidan Yibeltal/BBC
image captionTheir vintage is unknown but these untouched bottles of wine, beer and olive oil were found in a dusty crate.
image copyrightKalkidan Yibeltal/BBC
image captionPresident Isaias Afwerki - who was joined at the embassy by his host Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed - raised Eritrea's flag there for the first time in 20 years...
image copyrightKalkidan Yibeltal/BBC
image caption... members of the press joined President Isaias (L) and Prime Minister Abiy (R) as they looked inside the diplomatic quarters.
image copyrightKalkidan Yibeltal/BBC
image captionStaff and building renovators say they do not know who is shown in these photographs - but believe they are family members of former embassy workers.
image copyrightKalkidan Yibeltal/BBC
image captionEthiopia's Prime Minister Abiy (C) handed the key to the embassy to Eritrea's President Isaias (R) as part of the official ceremony.
image copyrightKalkidan Yibeltal/BBC
image captionFanfare marked the visit of the two leaders to Eritrea's embassy in Addis Ababa - its doors are to re-open as part of Ethiopia's ongoing drive to re-establish relations with its neighbour.

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