Preserving Mali's rural life in pictures

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Photographer Boukary Konate is documenting scenes from rural life in his native Mali for the "internet generation", and before this way of life disappears entirely. His project is called Quand le Village Se Reveille (When the Village Wakes Up).

image copyrightB Konate
image captionHardship is part of rural life in Mali where farmers like this woman use rudimentary "watering bowls" to fetch water. "New media technologies widen the gap between the traditional and the modern; between the old and the young. Luckily, they could also be used to rescue the traditional and the old," says Mr Konate.
image copyrightB Konate
image captionNomads from the Peul (Fulani) community take their cattle around the country in search of the best pastures. Here they are crossing the River Niger following the first heavy rains of the season...
image copyrightB Konate
image captionThe nomads use donkeys to transport their possessions - and those who need a break from walking...
image copyrightB Konate
image captionTemporary houses are made from straw and palm leaves until it is time to move on again.
image copyrightB Konate
image captionIt is not only nomads who move around a lot. These villagers from Lassa near Bamako, the capital, are performing an annual traditional ceremony marking the departure of youths for the cities, where they hope life will be easier and money more readily available.
image copyrightB Konate
image captionAncient ceremonies, such as this Masked Dance - or Sogobo - in the Dogon community, play a key role in rural life, bringing people together and providing a break from the hard work.
image copyrightB Konate
image captionHunters also play a vital role in maintaining social harmony. They not only provide meat, they are also entertainers known for the Donso Gnenadje or Hunters' Dance.
image copyrightB Konate
image captionMost villages do not have electricity so people use shea butter lamps like this one to provide light.
image copyrightB Konate
image captionCotton is one of Mali's main exports and villagers use "cotton gins" like this one to separate cotton fibres from seeds.

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