In pictures: Moel Famau's Jubilee Tower ruins celebrated

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A walk and official opening ceremony takes place on Friday at the landmark ruins of Jubilee Tower on Moel Famau in Denbighshire following the completion of access improvement and restoration work
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It is the first time the tower has undergone any significant work since 1969 and it now exposes the interior of the tower which collapsed in the 1860s. Overlooking Mold and the wider Flintshire and Denbighshire area, it was built in 1810 to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of King George III
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Denbighshire and Flintshire councils secured funds and Wrexham architects TACP drew up the plans to restore one of the tower's columns and improve access to the top, which has become a viewpoint attracting 200,000 visitors annually. This is an Edwardian image of the Jubilee Tower after it collapsed
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Conservators Kinmel Bay-based Grosvenor Construction carried out the restoration and revamp work which includes creating an internal staircase. They had to work through "harsh conditions" including heavy snow, at the summit
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Matthew Gregory, a director for TACP Architects, said the work included removing rubble which had fallen around the ruins during the tower collapse and exposed some interesting features including old graffiti
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The work was partly carried out to improve access due to the tower's steep steps. Councillor Carolyn Thomas, chair of the Clwydian Range and Dee Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, said the work was timely because despite being an "iconic landmark" some may have "taken it for granted over the years"
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The walk and opening ceremony leaves Pen Barras car park at 14:00 BST on Friday

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