Wales

£3m to protect Welsh and Irish coast from climate change

Skerries islet off Anglesey is home to a lighthouse, historic buildings and fragile archaeological earthworks Image copyright RCAHMW
Image caption Skerries islet off Anglesey is home to a lighthouse, historic buildings and fragile archaeological earthworks

Coastal tourist sites most affected by climate change, erosion and rising sea levels in Wales will be analysed as part of a £3.4m project.

It will fund new excavations, marine mapping and landscape modelling at the islands off Pembrokeshire and the Llyn Peninsula in Gwynedd.

The research aims to help safeguard the sites from the risk of climate change and minimise the impact on local economies.

Sites in Ireland will also benefit.

The five-year EU-funded project will also support plans for future climate change management and look at the longer-term changes to Wales and Ireland's coasts.

It will also provide training to encourage the development of tourism opportunities in both areas.

The project will be led by the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, along with Aberystwyth University, the Discovery Programme: Centre for Archaeology and Innovation Ireland and Geological Survey, Ireland.

Image copyright Tom Arnold
Image caption Pembrokeshire's Skomer Island, which is home to a colony of puffins, might also be studied as part of the project

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