NE Scotland, Orkney & Shetland

Bones and wall uncovered at clifftop fort in Aberdeenshire

Panoramic shot of the dig site Image copyright Katie South
Image caption Tests to date charcoal and bones found at Dillyminnen are to be carried out

The first modern archaeological excavation of an ancient clifftop fort in Aberdeenshire has begun.

Several digs were done at Dillyminnen, near Gamrie, in the 1860s.

The remnants of two rectangular buildings were identified and unidentifiable bone fragments and a glass bead were found at the time.

A large stone wall along with charcoal and bones have now been uncovered by a team of archaeologists from the University of Aberdeen.

Further analysis of the charcoal and bones will be done, including tests to radiocarbon-date the finds.

Image copyright Northern Picts Project
Image caption A wall has been uncovered during the new excavation

Dillyminnen is one of more than 500 known promontory forts in Scotland.

Archaeologists said it was possibly of Pictish origin.

The new excavation is being done as part of the University of Aberdeen's Northern Picts Project, under the supervision of Dr Gordon Noble.

Image copyright Northern Picts Project
Image caption Dillyminnen is one of more than 500 known promontory forts in Scotland