Glasgow Caledonian University renames building after Annie Lennox

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Anne Lennox outside Glasgow Caledonian UniversityImage source, Glasgow Caledonian University
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Annie Lennox will attend the university over the next two days to present degrees to graduates.

Glasgow Caledonian University has renamed a building on its campus after singer and activist Annie Lennox.

The former Eurythmics star, who became the university's first female chancellor in 2018, said it was an "incredible honour".

GCU principal Prof Pamela Gillies said renaming the building was in recognition of everything she had done for the university and its students.

Ms Lennox will attend three graduation ceremonies over the next two days.

The 67-year-old singer-songwriter grew up in Aberdeen before achieving pop success in the late 1970s with the Tourists.

She and fellow musician Dave Stewart went on to achieve international stardom in the 1980s as Eurythmics, with hits such as "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" and "There Must Be an Angel (Playing with My Heart)".

As well as a successful solo career, Ms Lennox made her name as an activist and humanitarian campaigner.

She has been a supporter of gender equality and climate action and took part in an online debate during COP26.

Her role as the Glasgow Caledonian's chancellor involves formal and ceremonial duties, such as conferring degrees on students and supporting in its social justice aims.

Ms Lennox said: "It's an incredible honour to have such a wonderful building on the Glasgow Caledonian University campus named after me.

"I'm looking forwards to taking part in GCU's graduation ceremonies this week in person, after the last two years, when the only way we could connect was via Zoom.

"I'm so proud of all the graduates, who've coped brilliantly with all the extra challenges, to finally succeed in reaching their goals and achievements."

Prof Gillies said: "Glasgow Caledonian University is extremely fortunate to have Dr Lennox as its Chancellor.

"Her passion, wisdom, guidance and support for our community, especially through the recent challenges of the pandemic, have been transformative."

The building was formerly known as the Hamish Wood building, after a former professor at the university, who died in 2009.