Scotland's papers: Chief medical officers back jabs for schoolchildren

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The UK's chief medical officers calling for 12 to 15-year-olds to be given a Covid vaccination dominates many of Scotland's front pages. The Scotsman says education unions and young people's groups have given their backing to the plan, which they believe will make schools safer for pupils and teaching staff.
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The Herald says all children aged 12 and over in Scotland are expected to be offered a single dose of the Pfizer vaccine in an attempt to cut the number of outbreaks in schools.
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As well as younger children being able to receive a first dose, The Times says most adults in the UK will be offered a Covid booster jab in the coming months. The paper says Prime Minister Boris Johnson will confirm that 33 million adults over 50 will be offered a Pfizer or Moderna jab, adding that people will be offered their third jab six months after their second and priority will follow the same list as the initial programme.
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The move to begin offering vaccines to 12 to 15-year-olds next week is the focus for the i, which says ministers hope it will stop school closures and help bring the pandemic to an end.
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The Metro says the decision to offer the vaccine to more children will make 3.2 million more youngsters eligible for the jab in the UK. It quotes England's chief medical officer Prof Chris Whitty as saying it had been a "difficult decision" but was "an important and potentially useful additional tool to help reduce public health impacts of school closures and quarantines".
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The Daily Telegraph says the UK government has confirmed that parental, guardian or carer consent will be sought by healthcare staff prior to vaccination in schools, however consent will not be needed if the child is considered competent to make a decision by themselves.
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The Daily Mail says the UK's four chief medical officers came to their decision amid "growing concerns about the impact of Covid on the day-to-day lives and education of youngsters".
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The Daily Express says First Minister Nicola Sturgeon is set to give the go-ahead for 12 to 15-year-olds to receive a vaccination as early as next week.
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Elsewhere, The Financial Times reports that the Treasury has "killed off" the PM's plan to build a tunnel between Scotland and Northern Ireland - estimated to cost at least £15bn. The paper says the move is part of a "crackdown" by the Treasury which is dealing with self-imposed public spending limits.
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The Scottish Sun leads with the arrest of a 19-year-old footballer following the death of a teenager in an alleged hit-and-run crash.
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The Daily Record focuses on the same story, saying the dead teenager had been hit by a car on Crow Road in Glasgow in the early hours of Saturday morning.
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The Press and Journal follows up on the story of an Aberdeen bishop being at the centre of "bullying" allegations. The paper says the Right Rev Anne Dyer, the Scottish Episcopal Church's bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney, has alleged that she has been the victim of "hate crimes".
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The National leads with Nicola Sturgeon telling the SNP conference that Boris Johnson's Westminster government is "utterly terrified" of Scottish independence.
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The Glasgow Times devotes much if its front page to concerns that the city's "crumbling" Shieldhall flyover could collapse.
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The Evening Telegraph leads with a teenage Dundee United player being banned from the road after crashing his car into a 15-tonne army truck on a busy Fife road.
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The Edinburgh News says there are concerns that jobs could be lost at Valneva's vaccine production centre in Livingston after the UK government cancelled an order for more than 100 million doses.
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The Daily Star says NHS bosses have been accused of sexism after telling mums-to-be to cook their partners "a special meal" so they don't feel left out during the pregnancy.

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