Scotland's papers: Craig Whyte trial and drug-drive testing

Published
Image source, Daily Record
Image source, Scottish Sun
Image source, Scotsman
Image source, The Herald
Image source, The National
Image source, Scottish Daily Mail
Image source, Scottish Daily Express
Image source, Daily Star
Image source, Courier
Image source, Press and Journal

The Daily Record leads with the fraud trial of former Rangers owner Craig Whyte.

It says the court heard Rangers would have to pay Ally McCoist an "enormous" sum of money if the club did not make him manager.

The Scottish Sun focuses on former Rangers manager Walter Smith being "distressed by Rangers' cash crisis" before Mr Whyte bought the Ibrox club.

The Scotsman leads with drivers in Scotland facing roadside drug tests from 2019 after ministers announced their intention to bring in limits "three years after the UK government led the way".

The Herald features claims by the charity Age Concern that thousands of older people are being left stranded without personal care "because cash-strapped councils are delaying treatment to save money".

The National says that Nicola Sturgeon has warned that the Conservatives under Theresa May "will impose further austerity and try to silence the Scottish Parliament".

The Scottish Daily Mail says police are investigating "after needles were found in supermarket tins".

Prime Minister Theresa May is to reject a fresh demand from Brussels for migrants in Britain to be guaranteed EU rights for life, according to The Scottish Daily Express.

The Daily Star of Scotland says TV ghost-hunting show Most Haunted "has finally captured a spook on camera" after 19 series.

The front page of the Fife edition of The Courier is dominated by a picture of rescue workers trying to refloat a minke whale which was stranded on the beach at Elie.

Scottish ministers could deliver a massive economic boost to the Highlands and islands by slashing the cost of flights to the region, according to the Highlands edition of the Press and Journal.

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