Northern Ireland

Adrian Ismay murder trial hears accused's brother 'turned off CCTV'

Adrian Ismay Image copyright Ismay family
Image caption Adrian Ismay died 11 days after he was injured when a bomb exploded under his van

A murder suspect's brother allegedly turned off CCTV before the defendant picked up a car linked to a bomb attack on a prison officer, a trial has heard.

Christopher Robinson, from Aspen Park in Twinbrook, denies murdering Adrian Ismay, who died 11 days after a bomb exploded under his van in 2016.

A witness claimed the accused's brother, Peter Robinson, switched off CCTV at the hostel they both worked at.

He claimed Peter Robinson told him it was because "our Chrissie" was coming.

'Not permitted'

It has previously been alleged that the defendant borrowed a Citroen C3 car from his sister-in-law and collected it from his brother.

The witness, a support worker at the hostel, told the court his conversation with Peter Robinson happened on the evening before the explosion.

He said switching off CCTV was not permitted and he walked out of the room because it was wrong.

Christopher Robinson is on trial for murder, causing an explosion and providing a car for terrorism.

Image copyright Pacemaker
Image caption Christopher Robinson denies Mr Ismay's murder

The 48-year-old defendant's non-jury trial had been adjourned since October but resumed on Tuesday.

Mr Ismay, a 52-year-old father of three, initially survived the explosion outside his east Belfast home, but died from his injuries 11 days later.

Unconfirmed sightings

The court was also shown CCTV footage of a car, allegedly carrying explosives, travelling through Belfast.

At earlier hearings, it had been alleged that Mr Robinson had driven a Citroen C3 to plant a bomb under Mr Ismay's van in east Belfast in March 2016.

A police officer gave evidence using numerous cameras tracking a Citroen from Tates Avenue through the Malone and Stranmillis area to the Ravenhill Road.

He confirmed that a small number of the alleged sightings of the car could not be confirmed.

Under cross examination by Mr Robinson's legal team, the detective constable agreed that the difference in the quality of digital images made tracking a vehicle a complex operation.

The trial continues.