Deep snow still lying in some areas of Northern Ireland

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image copyrightGetty Images
image captionThe severe weather conditions are still having an impact across many parts of Northern Ireland
image copyrightMoD
image captionA military helicopter has been in operation during severe weather conditions in Northern Ireland
image copyrightGetty Images
image captionSearch and rescue operations are continuing for livestock missing in remote areas
image copyrightPaul Faith
image captionA military helicopter will deliver emergency food supplies to stranded animals for a second day
image copyrightGetty Images
image captionAn Irish Army Helicopter is also on stand-by to help, if needed
image copyrightPAcemaker
image captionDepartment of Agriculture advisors have identified the areas where the animals are most at risk
image copyrightReuters
image captionThe Glens of Antrim has been one of the areas worst affected by the snow
image copyrightReuters
image captionNorthern Ireland agriculture minister Michelle O'Neill said that she would press for a hardship payment for farmers at an executive meeting
image copyrightMartin McKenna
image captionThe agriculture minister said she would also be talking to the banks as farmers affected were not going to be able to have the income they expected
image copyrightMartin McKenna
image captionThe after effects of the severe weather has also impacted on sport and leisure activities
image copyrightAmanda Killen
image captionThe Easter Stages Rally, which was due to take place this weekend across Counties Down and Antrim, has been cancelled
image copyrightRichard Moore
image captionThose involved in the multi-agency operation have warned hill walkers of snow hazards such as "cornices and avalanche risks" in those areas affected by snow and strong winds
image copyrightJoe Laverty
image captionA police spokesperson said the public should consider the potential risks before embarking on any walks in these areas

The severe weather conditions are still having an impact across many parts of Northern Ireland.

Search and rescue operations are continuing for livestock missing in remote areas, and a military helicopter delivered emergency food supplies to stranded animals for a second day.

An Irish Army Helicopter is also on stand-by to help, if needed.

Department of Agriculture advisors have identified the areas where the animals are most at risk.

BBC Northern Ireland District Reporter David Maxwell was in the Glens of Antrim on Wednesday.

He said "there was no thaw in sight" and that although roads "were slowly being opened up" people were still in a "terrible situation".

He visited the mother of a six-week-old baby at Feystown near Glenarm, who said she had been coping in recent days without water and electricity.

She has received supplies including baby food and baby wipes via police helicopter.

More than 130 Roads Service gritters have been in operation across Northern Ireland in a bid to clear the snow.

The forestry service has also deployed specially-adapted vehicles in counties Fermanagh, Londonderry and Antrim.

A RAF Chinook helicopter has made food drops to thousands of animals stranded, mostly in the Glens of Antrim, which has been one of the areas worst affected by the snow.

It travelled from its base in Hampshire on Tuesday morning and landed at Aldergrove at about 12:30 GMT.

A member of staff from the Department of Agriculture travelled with the Chinook crew to tell them exactly where to drop the feed.

The Irish government has agreed to provide air corps assistance following discussions between the Northern Ireland agriculture minister Michelle O'Neill and the Irish justice minister Alan Shatter.

On Tuesday, Ms O'Neill said that she would press for a hardship payment for farmers at an executive meeting.

Immediate practical issues for farmers include the disposal of dead livestock. The agriculture minister said she would also be talking to the banks as farmers affected were not going to be able to have the income they expected.

Medication and food have also been delivered by helicopter to people left snowbound by the severe weather.

'Good neighbours'

media captionDavid Maxwell has been to see a couple and their newborn baby at Feystown in the snow-bound hills above Glenarm

Those involved in the multi-agency operation have warned hill walkers of snow hazards such as "cornices and avalanche risks" in those areas affected by snow and strong winds.

A police spokesperson said the public should consider the potential risks before embarking on any walks in these areas.

The PSNI has also appealed to members of the public to be "good neighbours" and look out for those who are particularly "isolated, vulnerable or who may need help".

The after effects of the severe weather have also impacted on sport and leisure activities.

The Easter Stages Rally, which was due to take place this weekend across Counties Down and Antrim, has been cancelled.

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