Suffolk

Ipswich Town fans raise thousands in Twitter ticket campaign

Karl Fuller Image copyright Karl Fuller
Image caption Karl Fuller's campaign has raised thousands of pounds to buy tickets for those who cannot afford them

Football fans have raised £2,400 in a crowdfunding campaign to buy tickets for fans who could not normally afford them.

Ipswich Town supporters contributed the sum to allow scores of people to watch a home game against West Bromwich Albion for free.

Town fan Karl Fuller, 47, started the initiative after seeing his children fill shoe boxes for charity.

He said: "I felt I wanted to do something, and it's been overwhelming."

The club will match the amount raised by fans, bringing the total to £4,800.

After he posted his initial offer to buy two tickets on Twitter, other fans joined in.

Mr Fuller, of Clacton, Essex, said an unnamed Town player and a former star had also contributed.

Club spokesman Steve Pearce said: "It's a great idea from Karl that has obviously been well supported by other Town fans."

Tickets will be distributed via four local charities and a school.

The idea is similar to the "suspended coffee" concept, where strangers can buy a hot drink anonymously for anyone who wants one.

Mr Fuller, a columnist for the East Anglian Daily Times and Ipswich Star, has supported the club for 40 years and said fans had a great reputation for "getting stuck into a good cause".

He said: "About a week ago, my twin girls were filling shoe boxes for underprivileged kids in Romania, and it made me sad that people out there still need help in this way."

Image copyright Steven Paston/PA
Image caption Mr Fuller said the response to the initiative had been "overwhelming"

An adult season ticket at Portman Road costs from about £380, with tickets to the West Brom game on 23 November reduced to £10 for adults as part of a "Black Friday" deal.

"Tickets are cheaper that night anyway, so I reckoned others might pitch in, but it's been unbelievable," said Mr Fuller.

He said an added benefit of the scheme was the chance for viewers to see fuller stands when the game is televised live.

"The league is a bit upside down at the moment, with Norwich up top," he said. "It might just be the little boost Ipswich need."

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