Suffolk

Suffolk affair GP guilty of misconduct

A married GP from Suffolk who had affairs with two female patients has been found guilty of misconduct.

A General Medical Council (GMC) panel found Dr Graeme Elvin's improper sexual conduct and dishonesty meant his fitness to practise was impaired.

Dr Elvin, who eventually left his wife for a patient referred to as Mrs C, admitted conducting an inappropriate relationship with a patient.

The panel has yet to decide what sanction to impose.

The hearing in London heard from Patient A, a married woman, who said she had gone to see Dr Elvin about persistent neck pain but there was "a spark of physical attraction" between them.

She said on 28 July 2006 things went a step further, leading to a relationship developing.

Harassment claim

She said: "He got up from his desk and came and kissed me on the lips and stroked my tummy whilst I was sitting on the chair."

It led to a series of clandestine meetings, with Dr Elvin repeatedly promising to leave his wife.

He eventually ended the affair in April 2008.

Meanwhile, behind the back of Patient A, he had already been seeing Mrs C.

At the same time, Dr Elvin was treating Patient A's husband, named by the panel only as Patient B, for an arthritic hip.

Mrs C eventually told the unwitting husband about his wife's affair, prompting him to confront Dr Elvin in the surgery car park and assault him in June 2009.

Dr Elvin attempted to cover up the affair, telling colleagues that Patient A had been "harassing him and his partner".

Announcing the findings of the hearing, the GMC said in a statement: "The panel was without any doubt that Dr Elvin had crossed the boundaries from the outset of his relationship with Patient A.

"Dr Elvin's misconduct was serious and prolonged, lasting for three years.

"His most recent dishonesty was less than two years ago.

"His failure to address his dishonesty in his declaration coupled with his improper sexual conduct with a patient, rightly viewed very seriously by the public and the profession, means that the panel is satisfied that his fitness to practise is impaired."

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