Sheffield & South Yorkshire

Boxer Tom Bell dies in Doncaster pub shooting

Tom Bell Image copyright Doncaster Plant Works ABC
Image caption Tom Bell was described as an "outstanding boxer" by a local coach

A 21-year-old boxer has been killed in a shooting at a pub.

Tom Bell was shot at the Maple Tree in Woodfield Way, Doncaster, on Thursday evening and died after being taken to hospital.

James Harrington, his coach as a professional, said: "Tom had his full life ahead of him, he would have been the very best out there."

South Yorkshire Police said investigations were ongoing and appealed for witnesses to contact them.

No-one else was hurt in the attack and no arrests have been made.

People living nearby described hearing a bang "like a firework" and then seeing people run from the pub to their cars and drive away.

Jimmy Hanrahan, Mr Bell's cousin, said: "Me and Tom were very close, we sparred together, trained together.

"Tom was the life of the party."

Image caption A window at the pub has been taped up by police and a cordon is in place
Image caption James Harrington said he hoped there would be "no repercussions" and "commonsense would prevail"

Doncaster Plant Works Amateur Boxing Club, where Mr Bell trained, said in a statement: "We are absolutely devastated to announce the passing of a great warrior who has spent a huge amount of time over the years boxing with our club."

Head coach Paul Harrison said Mr Bell had boxed at the gym before turning professional aged 18.

He said: "Tom was an outstanding boxer, but also a considerate human being, who continued to visit the gym, inspiring and encouraging other young people, long after he went professional.

"Our gym will be a little emptier without him."

Image caption Floral tributes have been left outside the pub where the shooting took place

Fellow boxer and WBC flyweight world champion Charlie Edwards paid tribute to Mr Bell on Twitter, describing his death as "absolutely devastating".

Leeds' Josh Warrington told the BBC: "In the gym he was always a happy chappy you know, cheeky smile and whatnot.

"Always one of them where, quite quiet in the gym, got down to work, but always had room for a bit of banter, a few jokes.

"No matter how hard the training was he was always smiling.

"When you talk about natural talent the guy had loads of it. He had the potential to go very, very far in the game.

"Not to see him again is saddening."

He also paid tribute to Mr Bell on Twitter.

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