Nottingham

Nottingham man who got explosives fearing 'Isis attack' jailed

Roger Smith leaving Nottingham Crown Court Image copyright PA
Image caption Roger Smith saw himself as a "crusader against Muslims", Nottingham Crown Court was told

A man who stockpiled explosive substances to defend the UK from so-called Islamic State has been jailed for four years.

Roger Smith, 46, was concerned about an attack similar to that on Fusilier Lee Rigby, Nottingham Crown Court was told.

Smith was found guilty in November of two counts of having explosive substances and of possessing a document for terrorist purposes.

The court heard Smith saw himself as a "crusader against Muslims".

The document charge related to a copy of the Anarchy Cookbook Version 2000, a guide to making bombs based on The Anarchist Cookbook.

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Judge Gregory Dickinson QC told Smith: "In your warped view of the world, you were preparing for the possibility of a local war with Islamic terrorists.

"In your own obsessive and misguided way, you were preparing for a fight that you believed to come."

Image copyright Nottinghamshire Police
Image caption Smith's trial heard he was concerned about "a terrorist attack or Islamic attack"

Police searched Smith's home in Clifton, Nottingham, on 21 October 2015 and found gunpowder and large amounts of chemicals that could be used to make explosives, along with a copy of the Anarchy Cookbook Version 2000.

Smith's trial heard he was concerned about "a terrorist attack or Islamic attack similar to the Lee Rigby attack".

PCSO Matthew Holden told jurors Smith believed a citizen should have the right to "bear arms", and said words to the effect that "Islam was an evil religion and Islam was at war with the West".

The prosecution told jurors there was no allegation Smith was a terrorist or that he was going to personally commit an act of terror.

The 'Cookbook'

Image copyright Nottinghamshire Police
  • Smith had a copy of the Anarchy Cookbook Version 2000, which was inspired by The Anarchist Cookbook, first published in 1971
  • William Powell, the original author of The Anarchist Cookbook, wrote it during the Vietnam War to express his anger against "unnecessary government-sanctioned violence" but has since called for it to be taken out of print
  • Both the original book and the book owned by Smith include instructions on how to make bombs and explosives
  • The book has been linked to terrorist attacks and mass murders, including the Columbine High School massacre

In his police interview, Smith said he made the gunpowder to entertain his young relatives by lighting it in the garden.

He claimed he had "an interest in chemistry" and had the weapons because he was a "survivalist" who liked to shoot arrows in his garden.

Image copyright Nottinghamshire Police
Image caption A variety of materials that could be used to make explosives were found at Smith's home

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