Snetterton crash: Barry Pritchard died after clipping rider's knee

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image copyrightEvelyn Simak/Geograph
image captionBarry Pritchard died at Snetterton Circuit in June 2020

A "highly-regarded" motorcyclist died at a track day after his bike clipped another rider on a hairpin corner and "cart-wheeled", an inquest heard.

Barry Pritchard, 70, died when he was thrown from his bike at Snetterton Race Circuit in Norfolk on 16 June.

The bike rotated "violently forward", and the most likely cause was sudden front-brake application, which caused the wheel to lock, jurors heard.

The jury concluded Mr Pritchard's death was an accident.

Since the crash, brake lever guards - used to stop the lever being depressed in a collision - have been made mandatory by MotorSport Vision, which runs Snetterton, jurors were told.

They heard Mr Pritchard, from Attleborough in Norfolk, was familiar with Snetterton and was "highly-regarded as one of the most experienced" riders.

The retired business owner was also an instructor and had ridden in the UK and Europe for "many years".

Bike 'cart-wheeled'

Jurors heard that David Caine and Craig Havlock were also in attendance at the non-competitive track day, operated by No Limits Track Days.

In a statement, Mr Caine said he was travelling behind Mr Havlock when another rider appeared to hit Mr Havlock's bike going into the second corner of the course.

"The bike flew up in the air... the bike then cart-wheeled," said Mr Caine.

Mr Havlock said in his statement the "other rider on my left hit my left knee".

The jury heard Mr Pritchard, who had been wearing a helmet, was given medical attention but pronounced dead about 20 minutes after the crash, having suffered "extensive skull injuries".

An examination of Mr Pritchard's bike found "no fault which caused or contributed to the incident".

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