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Manchester Arena Inquiry: Jane Tweddle was 'shoulder to cry on'

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media captionBomb victim Jane Tweddle was 'shoulder to cry on'

The daughters of a Manchester Arena blast victim have paid tribute to their "warrior mum" who treated "everyone with kindness decency and respect".

A series of hearings have been taking place where relatives of the 22 people killed in the 2017 bombing have provided personal insights into the lives of their loved ones and how their lives were changed forever by the attack.

The final day of "pen portraits" continued with the 51-year-old school receptionist and mother-of-three Jane Tweddle from Blackpool.

Ms Tweddle's mother Margaret told the inquiry that "what happened in Manchester that night was evil and we won't let evil win".

"Jane would not want that," she said.

She added: "There is not a day that goes by when I don't miss her smile, her laughter and her love of life."

A statement from Jane's daughters Harriet, Isabelle and Lily described her as "our warrior mum teaching us to be kind and to always stick together".

'Brighten someone's day'

They added: "Our house was always full of love and laughter. You'd pull the oldest tricks in the book to get us laughing…you never failed to make us smile.

"You always knew how to brighten someone's day and make them feel loved. You treated everyone with kindness, decency and respect.

"You rarely got mad and when you did you probably had a damn good reason, especially having to deal with three teenage girls."

One daughter recalled her mum's "random spontaneous ideas" such as "a rollerblade race down the street in the middle of summer, wearing maxi dresses - not sure who won but we were in stitches".

Ms Tweddle, who was originally from Hartlepool, loved going back to her parents' home, her daughters said, "staying in your PJs all day, shouting 'mum'".

They recalled her "special and comical relationship with Nan".

image copyrightFamily handout
image captionJane Tweddle was "the perfect listener", her family said

She was a "loyal sister" and a "loving auntie" who provided a second home for nieces and nephews, her family said.

Ms Tweddle's daughters said she was a secondary school receptionist who was "made for the job - friendly and full of life" and was "cherished and trusted by the young lives you touched".

Her daughters added: "Children from all backgrounds would open up to you about their home lives and personal struggles - the perfect listener.

"You were a shoulder to cry on and a source of support for so many."

They added: "There is nothing in this world we wouldn't give to hear your voice, see your smile or hold your hand for just one more minute.

"You were taken so fast and you were so loved but now you rest high, peacefully we love you endlessly now we all have an angel to call by name."

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