Manchester

Man Utd reports the Sun over vice-chairman home attack

Ed Woodward Image copyright PA Media
Image caption Ed Woodward was not at home when his home came under attack

Manchester United have accused the Sun newspaper of receiving advanced notice of an intended attack on the house of executive vice-chairman Ed Woodward.

The club has filed a complaint to the press regulator regarding the Sun's coverage of the attack on 28 January.

The newspaper confirmed a reporter attended "following a tip-off that there was to be a protest".

But it added it was not made aware of "what was to take place nor incited it or encouraged any criminal activity".

In a statement, Manchester United said: "The Club believes that the Sun newspaper had received advance notice of the intended attack, which included criminal damage and intent to intimidate, and that the journalist was present as it happened.

"The quality of the images accompanying the story indicate that a photographer was also present.

"Not only did the journalist fail to discharge the basic duty of a responsible member of society to report an impending crime and avert potential danger and criminal damage, his presence both encouraged and rewarded the perpetrators."

'Condemns fully'

In response, the Sun said it "condemns fully" the attack on Mr Woodward's home and that it was "happy to cooperate fully with any police inquiry".

It added that it "vigorously" defended its right to report and that the article "made it clear that the behaviour was criminal and unacceptable".

The attack on Mr Woodward's house in Cheshire saw a flare thrown and a group chanting that he was "going to die".

Mr Woodward and his family were not at home at the time.

The newspaper said it "accurately reported the events that unfolded" and that it "supports wholeheartedly the Editors' Code Of Conduct and will defend the complaint to IPSO".

Related Topics

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites