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Rolex murder: Man and woman jailed for killing Paul Tong

Aliysa Ellis and Christopher McDonald Image copyright Met Police
Image caption Aliysa Ellis (left) and Christopher McDonald (right) were sentenced at the Old Bailey on Monday

A man and woman have been jailed over the murder of a father who was killed for the sake of a Rolex watch.

Paul Tong, 54, was attacked at his home in Ealing, west London, 19 on April 2017. His body was found the next day, the Old Bailey was told.

Christopher McDonald, 35, from Croydon, south London, was jailed for life with a minimum term of 32 years for the murder.

Aliysa Ellis, 31, from Ealing, was jailed for 13 years for manslaughter.

McDonald and Ellis, a friend of Tong's, were also convicted of conspiracy to rob.

Attacked with exercise weight

The court was told McDonald, who gained a first class degree in psychology, had been on life licence for public protection at the time of the killing.

Mr Tong, a fitness fanatic known as Yankee, was attacked by McDonald with an exercise weight.

When police officers found him the following day, his body was partially covered by bedding at a "contorted and unnatural angle" and his room had been ransacked, jurors heard.

All that remained in the father-of-one's bedroom was an empty Rolex box with Ellis's fingerprint inside it, the Old Bailey was told.

Image copyright Met Police
Image caption An exercise weight was used to inflict injuries on Mr Tong

A post-mortem examination revealed Mr Tong, who was of "muscular build", had cuts and bruises on his head and body, broken ribs and a ruptured liver from "blunt impacts".

Det Sgt Lee Tullett, of Scotland Yard, said: "Ellis knew that Paul Tong dealt drugs and kept cash and other valuables in his bedroom, and she conspired with McDonald to rob him.

"Paul was subjected to a violent attack and the pair then callously left him fatally injured in his bedroom before his body was found the next day."

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