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Pret sandwich death: Parents optimistic over 'Natasha's law'

Natasha Ednan-Laperouse Image copyright PA
Image caption Natasha Ednan-Laperouse, 15, died after suffering an allergic reaction to a Pret sandwich in 2016

The parents of a girl who died after suffering an allergic reaction to a Pret A Manger sandwich are optimistic of changes to allergen labelling becoming law "by the end of 2019".

Natasha Ednan-Laperouse, 15, collapsed during a flight from Heathrow to Nice in 2016 and died within hours.

Her parents met the Environment Secretary to lobby for all pre-packaged food to clearly show allergens.

Michael Gove said businesses should "not wait for the law to change".

Natasha's father Nadim blamed her death on "inadequate food labelling laws".

A coroner found that Natasha, from Fulham, south-west London, had been "reassured" by the lack of specific allergen information on the packaging.

Following the inquest, Pret announced it would be listing all ingredients on its freshly made food.

However, her parents are keen for it to become law for all pre-packaged products to clearly show what allergens are in the ingredients.

Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Michael Gove said it was an "honour" to meet Tanya and Nadim Ednan-Laperouse

After meeting Mr Gove her parents said in a joint statement that "an internal review of the law will take place before Christmas, ahead of a consultation in the New Year".

They added: "We have every hope that Natasha's law could be a reality by the end of next year."

Earlier this month Mr Gove told civil servants to investigate a law change, after Natasha's death highlighted the "importance of acting urgently".

After meeting Natasha's parents he said the government had been "working at pace" with the Food Standards Agency and businesses to review the current allergen labelling laws.

He added: "We are aiming to bring forward concrete proposals to change the law around the turn of the year.

"I also want to make clear that businesses do not need to wait for the law to change to do the right thing. They should be doing all they can now to make sure consumers have the information they need to stay safe."

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