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Baby P's mother Tracey Connelly refused parole

Tracey Connelly Image copyright Met Police

The mother of Baby P is still a danger to the public and should not be freed from prison in the new year, the Parole Board has ruled.

Tracey Connelly, 33, was jailed in 2009 and let out on licence in 2013, but returned to prison for breaching her parole conditions this year.

Earlier this month, a Parole Board panel decided against directing her release.

A spokesman said she would be eligible for review within two years.

The spokesman added: "The Parole Board is unable to comment on the specifics of any case due to the Data Protection Act."

Connelly admitted causing or allowing her one-year-old son Peter's death soon after being charged, and spent more than a year on remand before being sentenced in May 2009.

She received a sentence of "imprisonment for public protection", which carries a minimum term after which prisoners can be considered for release.

Image copyright ITV News
Image caption Peter Connelly died in 2007 after suffering more than 50 injuries

When deciding whether to release a prisoner, the Parole Board considers the nature of their crime, their history, their progress in prison, any statements made on their behalf and reports from relevant professionals.

Peter Connelly died in Tottenham, north London on August 3 2007 at the hands of his mother, her boyfriend, Steven Barker, and their lodger, Jason Owen.

Barker was given a 12-year sentence for his "major role" in Peter's death.

Owen was jailed indefinitely with a minimum three-year term, but later on appeal that was changed to a fixed six-year term. He was freed in August 2011 but has since been recalled to prison.

Peter suffered more than 50 injuries despite being on the at-risk register and receiving 60 visits from social workers, police and health professionals over the final eight months of his life.

A series of reviews identified missed opportunities when officials could have saved the toddler's life if they had acted properly on the warning signs.

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