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Hatton Garden raider 'hid loot in family graves'

Images of the items found in the grave Image copyright Metropolitan Police
Image caption Police found bags containing jewellery buried at Edmonton Cemetery, the jury were told

One of the Hatton Garden raiders buried his share of the £14m stash under two family graves, but tried to dupe police by just revealing one, a court has heard.

Daniel Jones, 58, who has admitted his involvement in the heist, offered to take police to the stashed loot.

Jewels, gold and gems were buried in Edmonton Cemetery in north London.

Three men deny conspiracy to commit burglary. A fourth denies conspiracy to conceal or transfer criminal property.

Police searched the area and found two bags, one containing jewellery and another precious stones, at a memorial site for Sidney James Hart, the grandfather of Jones' children.

'Larger stash'

Jones was then taken from prison and led the officers to another relation's memorial, where a smaller stash of gold, jewellery and gems were hidden.

Prosecutor Philip Evans told Woolwich Crown Court: "He was hoping if he gave up the smaller quantity at plot GB177 he would still have access to the larger stash of criminal property, no doubt for his future use."

Jones told police he was the only person who knew of the stash and declared "there's no other outstanding property. That is all I had", the court heard.

Image copyright Metropolitan Police
Image caption Holdalls containing "vast quantities of jewels" were found by police, the court heard
Image copyright Met Police
Image caption The burglars returned to the vault after being foiled by a metal cabinet which was bolted to the floor, the court was told
Image copyright Metropolitan Police
Image caption Rings worth up to £15,000 each were found by police following the heist, the court heard.

Jurors were told earlier how the mastermind behind the Hatton Garden raid pulled out of the heist after failing to complete the task in one night.

Brian Reader, 76, dubbed the "Master" by co-conspirators, withdrew from the raid when the gang struggled to get into the vault in one night.

Up to £14m was looted from 73 safety deposit boxes in London's jewellery quarter two days later on 4 April.

The gang drilled into the secure premises on 2 April but discovered the vault was blocked off by a metal cabinet, bolted to the floor on the other side, Woolwich Crown Court heard.

The men returned with different equipment two nights later to finish the job, but Reader was not with them when they made off with the loot, which was later hidden in two wheelie bins and stashed in holdalls.


Defendants and charges

  • Carl Wood, 58, of Elderbeck Close, Cheshunt, Hertfordshire: Charged with conspiracy to commit burglary and conspiracy to conceal, convert or transfer criminal property
  • William Lincoln, 60, of Winkley Street, Bethnal Green: Charged with conspiracy to commit burglary and conspiracy to conceal, convert or transfer criminal property
  • Jon Harbinson, 42, of Beresford Gardens, Benfleet, Essex: Charged with conspiracy to commit burglary and conspiracy to conceal, convert or transfer criminal property
  • Hugh Doyle, 48, of Riverside Gardens, Enfield: Charged with conspiracy to conceal, convert or transfer criminal property and faces an alternative charge of concealing, converting or transferring criminal property

Previously John Collins, 75, of Bletsoe Walk, Islington; Daniel Jones, 58, of Park Avenue, Enfield; Terry Perkins, 67, of Heene Road, Enfield and Brian Reader, 76, of Dartford Road, Dartford, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit burglary.

They will be sentenced at a later date.


Image copyright Met Police
Image caption Terry Perkins, John Collins, Daniel Jones and Brian Reader pleaded guilty to conspiracy to burgle

The court heard after the raid - the "largest burglary in English legal history" - the gang stored the loot in two wheelie bins and some holdalls. Some was also hidden behind skirting boards and inside kitchen cupboards in their own homes.

The plan was to convert the stolen goods into money, but initially they divided the proceeds between them, with the intention of keeping it hidden until publicity surrounding the heist died down, it was said.

"When they were confident that had happened, they could split it up, melt it down, sell it or hide for a rainy day," Mr Evans said.

Jurors heard part of the bounty was sold for sizeable sums of money.

Officers swooped during one of the loot transfers to Mr Harbinson on 19 May.

In the days before, police recording devices picked up Perkins boasting about the historic feat, saying: "And what a book you could write."

He also described how some of the stolen "Indian" gold would fund his pension.

The trial continues.

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