LSE lecturer Dr Satoshi Kanazawa tells of race blog 'regret'

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A lecturer at the London School of Economics (LSE) has apologised for a blog which discussed "why black women are less physically attractive".

Dr Satoshi Kanazawa said he was sorry for any offence caused and for any damage to the school.

LSE began an inquiry into the blog and concluded his arguments were "flawed".

The inquiry panel also ruled he had brought the school into disrepute and barred him from teaching compulsory courses this academic year.

The lecturer has also been banned from publishing in non-peer-reviewed outlets for 12 months.

Unintended consequences

Dr Kanazawa, a reader in the management department at the LSE had cited the findings of a University of North Carolina survey in which he said interviewers rated the "physical attractiveness" of subjects.

Start Quote

I accept I made an error in publishing the blog post”

End Quote Dr Satoshi Kanazawa

The LSE report said: "The arguments used in the publication were flawed and not supported by evidence, that an error was made in publishing the blog post and that Dr Kanazawa did not give due consideration to his approach or audience."

It concluded: "It was the opinion of the hearing that the publication of the article had brought the school into disrepute.

"The school has accepted that Dr Kanazawa has learnt from this experience and will not make the same errors in future."

In a letter to LSE Director Professor Judith Rees, Dr Kanazawa said: "I regret that the controversy surrounding its publication has offended and hurt the feelings of so many both inside and outside the school."

He added: "It was not at all motivated by a desire to seek or cause controversy and I deeply regret the unintended consequences that its publication nevertheless had because of my error in judgment.

"I accept I made an error in publishing the blog post."

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