Lincolnshire

Lancaster bomber reunion film premieres in Lincolnshire

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Media captionClip courtesy of Suddenly SeeMore Productions

World War two veterans have gathered to watch the UK premiere of a film about the last two airworthy Lancaster bombers.

"Reunion of Giants" tells the story of the Canadian aircraft, Vera, during its visit to the the UK in 2014.

It gave a series of displays alongside the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight's Lancaster.

The film was premiered on Monday in Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire, the home of the 617 "Dambusters" Squadron.

The reunion is believed to be the final time the two aircraft will fly together because of their age and condition.


Canadian Lancaster in the UK

Image copyright Mick Ryan/Fotovue
Image caption Vera took part in a number of flypasts including over the Derwent Dam
  • It is understood that the visit was the first time two or more Lancasters had flown together since 1964
  • Vera was flown to and from the UK via Iceland and Greenland
  • Engine problems meant Vera had to fly back to Canada with a borrowed UK engine
  • It is estimated both Lancasters flew about 6,000 miles (9,656 km )attending shows and events during the reunion

Former flight engineer, Vernon Morgan, who was invited to the premiere, said: "It was very well put together and very good for enhancing the memory of the people of Bomber Command.

"Seeing the Lancaster getting in to it and starting the engines, we've all done that, we've all been through it. It made you relive it."

The film's producer and director, Morgan Elliott, said she wanted the documentary to "play with emotions".

"It really is about the journey of how these adventurers from Canada brought the 70-year-old bomber across the North Atlantic" she said.

"We had unprecedented access at Coningsby and showed how the girls actually got in the air and how the airshow got developed".

She described the premiere as an "emotional event" as she watched the reaction of veterans who feature in the film.

About 7,300 Lancasters were built during World War Two but most of those that survived the fighting were scrapped.

The aircraft is best known for its part in attacking German dams in 1943, before entering popular folklore in The Dam Busters film.

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