Leicester

Leicestershire village records more than half a million speeding motorists

Coventry Road in Sharnford showing the STAG speed meter display and the fixed display Leicestershire County Council speed limit sign Image copyright Stag
Image caption Coventry Road in Sharnford showing the STAG speed meter display (right) and the fixed display county council speed limit sign

Villagers who set up their own speed monitor say they have recorded more than half a million drivers breaking the 30mph limit since November 2015.

Sharnford Traffic Action Group (STAG) said some motorists were clocked at "eye watering" speeds topping 100mph.

It has campaigned against dangerous driving on Aston Lane and the B4114 in Leicestershire for more than 10 years.

The county council has offered to install speed bumps on Aston Lane at a cost of £12,000 to the parish council.

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Motorists have been recorded by the village's speed monitor, which is moved around Sharnford - located near Hinckley and about 11 miles (17.7 km) from Leicester.

Image copyright Stag
Image caption A car on the B4114 Leicester Road overtaking a white car on the approach to a pedestrian crossing

STAG, which owns the monitor, sends the speeds of the vehicles to Leicestershire Police and the county council every month.

It said according to its data, more than 13,000 motorists drove above 50mph in a 30mph zone in the past year and about 562,000 since November 2015.

In the space of about 15 months, a total of 2.75m vehicles travelled through the village and about one in five - around 21% - were speeding, the data suggested.

The group claims that if they had the powers to fine drivers the charges would total £5.6m.

Image copyright Stag
Image caption STAG said pedestrians have been knocked over by lorries trying to navigate the narrow streets

Sharnford parish councillor Mike Shirley, secretary of STAG, said: "The eye-watering figures demonstrate the inarguable need for proper, enforceable speed monitoring 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in the interests of safety."

He added that homes have been damaged, lampposts and signs felled and pedestrians knocked over by lorries trying to navigate the narrow streets.

Leicestershire County Council said their own speed survey showed the village would "not qualify" for speed cameras and it cannot afford to build a bypass without government funding.

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