Lancashire

Boy brain damaged at Blackpool hospital awarded £27m

Blackpool Victoria Hospital Image copyright Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Image caption The hospital trust is yet to comment on the settlement

A seven-year-old boy born severely disabled "due to a delay in his delivery" will receive about £27m in compensation from the NHS.

The High Court heard the boy was brain damaged when he was born at Blackpool Victoria Hospital in Lancashire.

The family's barrister told the court the boy's father, who cares for him full time, could not afford the train fare to attend the proceedings.

The hospital trust has apologised to the boy's family.

Judge Mrs Justice Lambert said the boy suffered from acute mental and physical disabilities and is cared for at home by his father.

The settlement means the boy, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, will get professional care for life.

He will receive a £5.7m lump sum, plus inflation linked and tax free payments each year to cover the costs of his care for life.

'Remarkable story'

Those payments will start at £88,000 a year, until the age of 11, before rising to £125,000 until his 19th birthday.

They will then increase again to £200,000 a year for the rest of the boy's life.

Mrs Justice Lambert said the family's plight was "a remarkable story" of a father's struggle to look after a gravely disabled boy.

"I must pay tribute to the father, who cares for his son on a full time basis," she said.

"He is a deeply conscientious man who has lavished care and attention on his family.

"His son loves stories, cartoons and soft toys and he plainly brings a great deal of joy into his father's life."

The family's barrister, William Featherby QC, said Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust admitted liability for his injuries "at an early stage".

A spokesman for the trust said: "The trust would like to reiterate its sincere apologies to the family of this young boy in what has been a very tragic case."

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