Kent

Chatham Fort Amherst storytellers sought for new tours

Fort Amherst Image copyright Fort Amerst
Image caption Fort Amherst was built in 1756 to defend Chatham naval dockyard and the River Medway against the threat of French invasion

New parts of a fort built to protect northern Kent during the Napoleonic wars are to be opened up to the public.

More buildings have been restored at Fort Amherst in Chatham and will eventually be added to new tours of the fortifications, a spokesman said.

New volunteers were also being sought as tour guides who could bring a "storytelling element" to the role.

An open day is being held at the Medway fort, which was built in 1756, on Saturday.

Mr Rogers, from the Fort Amherst Trust, said: "Not only are the new tours going to take in previously unused areas and routes, but they will also be aimed at providing different experiences."

The fort has also opened up new attractions including owl encounters, archery, a 1940s fair, along with ghost tours and paranormal investigations, chairman Les Snowdon said.

He said volunteers had donated "impressive" time and energy to entertain, educate and maintain the 20-acre site since it opened in the 1980s, and the fort now needed to expand its team.

Fort Amherst was built to defend Chatham naval dockyard and the River Medway against the threat of French invasion.

It has been described by English Heritage as the most complete Napoleonic fortification in Britain.

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