Humberside

Jeremy Timm leaves Church of England over his same-sex marriage

Jeremy Timm
Image caption Jeremy Timm took part in his final service at Howden Minster

A Church of England lay reader has left the church as he is not allowed to officiate once his planned same-sex marriage goes ahead.

Jeremy Timm, of the Howden Team Ministry, took part in his final service at Howden Minster, East Yorkshire.

The Archbishop of York can withdraw the licence if Mr Timm's civil partnership is converted to marriage.

A statement for the archbishop said there would be no public comment.

It said there would be only direct communication with Mr Timm.

Parliament made same-sex marriage legal in England and Wales in March 2014, but the Church of England's doctrine holds that marriage can be only between a man and a woman.

During Sunday's service Mr Timm's announcement of his intention to marry his partner of 15 years on Thursday, and leave the church was greeted with applause.

He handed over his reader's robe to the church warden and said he hoped to return in the future.

He has previously said: "Marriage is the way in which people, same-sex or not, show their love and commitment to each other."

His decision to leave the church was announced in August in a blog on the Changing Attitude website.

The statement from the archbishop's office said the relevant guidelines were on the Diocese of York website and "this guidance is clear in expecting the same of readers as the Church of England does of its clergy".

Canon Law: Holy Matrimony

"The Church of England affirms, according to our Lord's teaching, that marriage is in its nature a union permanent and lifelong, for better for worse, till death them do part, of one man with one woman, to the exclusion of all others on either side, for the procreation and nurture of children, for the hallowing and right direction of the natural instincts and affections, and for the mutual society, help and comfort which the one ought to have of the other, both in prosperity and adversity."

Source: Church of England website

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites