Device enables Crohn's patient able to manage own condition

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Daniel Waters receiving a demo from Emma Ludlow at The Insides CompanyImage source, Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust
Image caption,
Daniel Waters has been helped to manage his condition by The Insides System

A Crohn's patient has been able to come off medication thanks to a new device.

Daniel Waters, 33, was diagnosed with the inflammatory bowel disease when he was 19 and recent emergency surgery left him unable to eat or drink.

His consultant at the Worcestershire Royal Hospital heard about The Insides System and recommended it to him.

He is one of 40 UK patients to use it and is now off all medication, eating and drinking small amounts and looking forward to a beer.

In April, Mr Waters, 33, of Evesham, suffered a perforated bowel and had surgery to remove almost 1ft (30cm) of damaged bowel. He was also given a stoma.

His remaining bowel was not absorbing enough nutrients and, relying on a liquid diet, he lost 9kg (19lbs) in weight.

He was told he would have to stay in hospital for four months taking more than 160 tablets a day until his strength could be built up enough for him to undergo a further operation to re-join the two ends of his bowel and reverse his stoma.

Image source, Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust
Image caption,
Daniel Waters was facing months in hospital away from his family

The father-of-two, who works in a warehouse, said: "The prospect of spending months in hospital without being able to eat or drink, or be at home with my family, was not a nice one."

His consultant, Pamela Sivathondan, learned about The Insides System which enables the intestinal losses from the stoma to be reinfused into the intestine, allowing Mr Waters to eat and drink normally and manage his condition.

Within two weeks, the device had arrived, been fitted and Mr Waters returned home on 15 June, she said.

Mr Waters is off all medication, the trust said, and eating and drinking small amounts.

He is looking forward to a haircut and, eventually, a trip to the pub to enjoy an ice cold glass of Coke, or beer if he is allowed, and a burger and chips.

His daughter, five, wants to play tag but he said she "might have to be a little more patient for that".

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