Hampshire & Isle of Wight

Pedestrian killed by overtaking motorbike in Southampton

Adam Wilcox Image copyright Police handout
Image caption Adam Wilcox was walking to work when he was hit by a motorbike, an inquest heard

A man died after stepping out in front of a motorbike that was overtaking stationary traffic, an inquest has heard.

Adam Wilcox, 55, died in hospital on 8 March, a day after being knocked down on the A27 in Mansbridge, Southampton.

The rider, Denzil Cannavo, 24, was drug-driving and not properly licensed, but could not have avoided the crash, Winchester Coroner's Court was told.

The coroner concluded the death was the result of a road traffic accident.

Mr Wilcox, from Bournemouth, was walking to work on a building site and may have been looking the opposite way from the approaching motorcycle when he emerged from in front of a stationary minibus, the court was told.

He suffered fatal head injuries when he hit the ground.

Image copyright Google
Image caption Mr Wilcox was hit by the motorbike on the A27 Mansbridge Road in Mansbridge, Southampton

The coroner heard Mr Cannavo, from Chandler's Ford, told witnesses: "I didn't see him, I just clipped him."

Dashcam footage showed the rider, who was travelling at between 20mph (32km/h) and 30mph (48km/h), would have had less than a second to react, the inquest was told.

Mr Cannavo was given a 12-month driving ban and a year-long conditional discharge by Southampton magistrates for driving under the influence of cannabis and for breaching his provisional licence conditions.

Senior Coroner Christopher Wilkinson said the death had arisen "solely as a result of Mr Wilcox's decision to cross the road when obscured".

He said he would raise concerns in a prevention of future deaths report about the absence of pedestrian crossings and the termination of the footpath at the scene, near the White Swan pub.

He added said there had been 15 previous "pedestrian strikes" and other incidents on the road over the past five years.

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