Devon

Classic cars taken up Lynton and Lynmouth cliff railway

Blue MG and white Citroen Image copyright Lynton & Lynmouth Cliff Railway
Image caption A blue MGB and a white Citreon DS were among the cars taken up on the railway

A water-powered Victorian cliff railway has been used to transport cars for the first time in 50 years.

A selection of classic cars were loaded individually onto the Lynton and Lynmouth cliff railway in Devon, to be transported 862ft (263m) to the top.

The last time cars were transported on the funicular railway was in 1952, to get them out of Lynmouth after major flooding.

It was also used in a marketing stunt in the 1960s to carry an E-type Jaguar.

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The cars were taken up the railway, which links the two coastal towns, as part of a photo shoot for a magazine.

Rob Shaddick, director of the railway said: "We got involved with Practical Classics magazine who were originally trying to locate a car from an old photo, and it sort of got out of hand.

"Now here we are sat on the railway in my Triumph, on the railway that my great-great-grandfather built."

Image copyright Lynton & Lynmouth Cliff Railway
Image caption The cliff railway was formerly used to transport goods and cars from between Lynmouth at the bottom, and Lynton at the top
Image caption The railway has not been used to transport cars for more than 50 years
Image copyright Lynton & Lynmouth cliff railway
Image caption Cars can no longer be removed at the top so they were returned to the bottom
Image copyright Lynton & Lynmouth Cliff Railway
Image caption The cliff railway was founded in 1890
Image copyright Lynton & Lynmouth Cliff Railway
Image caption The rail track rises 500ft (152m) with a gradient of 57%
Image copyright Lynton & Lynmouth Cliff Railway
Image caption It is one of only three fully water-powered railways left in the world

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