Cornwall

Cornwall precious Jewish Torah Scroll handed back

Torah Scroll
Image caption Torah Scrolls are so precious they cannot be touched and a pointer is used to read them

A historic religious scroll kept in a museum for more than 100 years has been repaired and returned to the Jewish community.

The Torah scroll, one of the holiest objects in the Jewish religion, has been kept in the Royal Cornwall Museum since Falmouth synagogue closed.

It has been restored and is thought to be the first Kosher scroll in the country to be given back by a museum.

Torah scrolls are considered so precious they cannot be touched.

Image caption The scroll was returned to the group by the Duke of Gloucester on behalf of the museum
Image caption The scroll was paraded through Truro for a re-dedication

Instead a pointer, or "yad", is used for reading them.

They form the central, most serious aspect of almost all festival services and are integral in ceremonies such as Bar and Bat Mitzvahs and baby blessings.

The Cornwall Museum had four Torah scrolls, of which Cornish Jewish group Kehillat Kernow chose one.

It was returned to the group by the Duke of Gloucester on behalf of the museum.

Kehillat Kernow chairman Harvey Kurzfield said: "It is going to be used in a living, vibrant Jewish community 350 years after it was first used in a Jewish community.

"To think that it has now come back into use is a great link with the past."

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