Cambridgeshire

YouTuber Ibz Mo graduates from University of Cambridge

Ibrahim Mohammed Image copyright @CamDiary
Image caption Ibrahim Mohammed could not hold back the tears as he graduated

A man who amassed 110,000 YouTube followers while vlogging about his experiences as an ethnic minority student at Cambridge University has graduated.

Ibrahim Mohammed, 23, known as Ibz Mo, campaigned for and celebrated diversity on his channel.

Graduating from Wolfson College, he said: "We broke barriers."

The Hackney-born student worked with the university to make it more accessible for minority groups.

He said: "I was brought up in a single-mother family, on free school meals, a poor stereotypical view of people who don't go to Cambridge."

During his three years of study he used his time to change perceptions of what a Cambridge student is and shared his experiences on YouTube.

Mr Mohammed said the majority of his university experience was positive, despite initially feeling "isolated".

His college had told him to "focus more on essays than videos" but the central university embraced his story telling and invited him to collaborate on projects.

Since then Mr Mohammed has produced videos sharing "different student experiences" from minority and disadvantaged groups.

"I think the reason they do so well is because it's the voices of people who aren't really heard," he said.

Mr Mohammed graduated with a BA in psychological and behavioural sciences on 29 July.

A university spokesman said: "Ibz is a great example of a student who can find their place at Cambridge and thrive here, no matter what their background."

Mr Mohammed believes the university and attitudes to minority students have "completely changed" since he started his degree.

He said he is "very proud" that current Cambridge students tell him they saw his videos and they made them apply.

He now plans to build a school in Pakistan and become a human rights lawyer.

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites