Bristol

'Plastic attack' packaging protesters hit Tesco near Bath

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Media captionCustomers ripped off the plastic packaging at the tills and left it behind.

Shoppers at a branch of Tesco have staged a "plastic attack" to protest against excessive packaging on groceries.

A group of about 25 customers at the supermarket in Keynsham, near Bath, ripped the wrapping off their goods and left it at the tills.

Tony Mitchell, who organised the protest, said "three huge trollies" were filled with discarded plastic.

Tesco said it was "absolutely committed to reducing plastic packaging".

After completing their weekly shop, the protesters paid for their groceries before taking scissors to the plastic packaging and leaving it behind for the store to deal with.

'Waitrose next'

Mr Mitchell, said the group had been a "bit apprehensive" but the response from supermarket staff had not been at all "hostile".

"The manager was there and he was being distant but friendly and, from what one or two people said, he sort of agreed with this," he said.

He added the group was not "picking on Tesco" and would be hitting the local Sainsbury's and Waitrose next.

"We'll certainly be doing the other supermarkets in the town which have not been making as much effort as they might have done," he said.

"And I personally will be quite happy to just strip my plastics off and drop them into a trolley but I'm not lacking in confidence that way."

Image copyright Kathy Farrell
Image caption Up to 25 customers at Tesco in Keynsham ripped the plastic packaging off their shopping and left it at the tills

Tesco has claimed that more than 78% of its packaging is recyclable.

A spokesperson said: "We're absolutely committed to reducing plastic packaging and would be happy to meet with these local campaigners as we develop our plans to make all our packaging fully recyclable or compostable by 2025."

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