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Trampoline ban for girl with Down's syndrome

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image copyrightAli King
image captionJuliet Scroggie, five, had gone with older sister Grace, and a friend, to the park in Sandwell

A girl with Down's syndrome was stopped from bouncing at a trampoline park, because she did not have her GP's approval.

Juliet Scroggie, five, had watched a safety video at Flip Out in Oldbury, Sandwell before she was stopped.

Her mother, Ali King, said staff were "discriminatory".

Flip Out's owner said it asked for children with Down's syndrome to have a fitness certificate from their doctor before using the trampolines.

Miss King said she had booked a session for her two daughters and a friend, and found no information about restrictions in the terms and conditions or waiver.

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On arrival, they were given wrist bands and watched the video before being told Juliet could not go on the trampolines "due to the increased risk of injury associated with people with Down's syndrome".

"To actually be through and think we are going, it was a missed opportunity to speak to us beforehand," she said.

"She has a good level of understanding so she knew what she was going to do that day... so it was really hard to have to pull her back."

Miss King was offered a full refund, but Juliet had to sit out while the older girls played.

image copyrightGoogle
image captionThe owner of a Flip Out trampoline park in Sandwell has apologised over the incident

Richard Beese, the owner of Flip Out UK, apologised for the misunderstanding and said safety was its "priority".

"We are devastated she had to go through reception and the safety briefing," he said.

"However, I am pleased our staff somewhat intercepted, because if something had happened, it would have been terrible."

New information has been added to its terms and conditions, he said.

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Related Topics

  • Down's syndrome
  • Sandwell

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