Berkshire

Reading Abbey Abbey ruins reopen after £3m repairs

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Media captionThe abbey, founded by Henry I in 1121, reopened following a three-year £3.15m conservation project

Reading Abbey's ruins have reopened to the public after being shut for nine years because of safety concerns.

The ruins were shut by the council in 2009 because of the danger of falling masonry from the 900-year-old walls.

The three-year £3.15m conservation project has been paid for by Reading Borough Council and the Heritage Lottery Fund.

The abbey, founded by Henry I in 1121, sits next to Reading Prison where Oscar Wilde was an inmate.

The site was officially reopened at 11:00 BST by town mayor Debs Edwards and the Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire James Puxley.

Image copyright Chris Forsey
Image caption The conserved Grade I-listed Reading Abbey Ruins
Image copyright Chris Forsey
Image caption The conservation work on the ruins - which are next to Reading Prison - took three years

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