England

Ron Hogg: 'Innovative' Durham PCC has motor neurone disease

PCC Ron Hogg Image copyright Labour
Image caption Ron Hogg won the race to become Durham's first police and crime commissioner in 2012

Durham's police and crime commissioner Ron Hogg has been diagnosed with motor neurone disease.

The 67-year-old announced he was standing down earlier this month after holding the post since 2012.

The news was revealed by Mr Hogg's acting successor Steve White, who said the former police officer was trying to adapt to a "devastating disease".

During Mr Hogg's time as PCC the Durham force had been rated 'outstanding' four times by government inspectors.

'Innovative approaches'

Mr White, who was Mr Hogg's chief executive, said: "He has to concentrate on stabilising his symptoms and adapting to the impact of this devastating illness.

"We all wish him and his wife Maureen our best wishes at this difficult time for them and his family and friends.

"Over the past six years Ron has been instrumental in helping the force achieve four years of successive 'outstanding' gradings for efficiency and effectiveness, along with him introducing innovative approaches to reduce crime and provide better outcomes for victims."

Football hooligans

Mr Hogg was a senior police officer in Durham and Cleveland during a 30-year career.

He rose to the rank of assistant chief constable in Durham and deputy chief with neighbouring Cleveland, before retiring in 2008.

He became an expert on policing methods for football hooliganism, and worked at international tournaments including the 2002 World Cup in South Korea and Japan.

In 2015 Mr Hogg offered cannabis users the chance to avoid prosecution by giving them the option to enrol on a course to deal with their habit, rather than being arrested.

He also said drug addicts should have access to "consumption rooms" where they could inject prescribed heroin legally to help take drugs off the streets and reduce crime.

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites