England

London's Eaton Square most expensive place to buy home in Britain

Eaton Square, the most expensive street to own a home in England and Wales Image copyright PA
Image caption At the top of the property pile is London's Eaton Square that will set you back £16,944,000 on average

London's Eaton Square has been named the most expensive place to buy property in Britain, with a home costing an average of nearly £17m.

The Belgravia address tops a list that shows every English region now contains "million pound" streets.

Research by Lloyds Bank also shows the most expensive street in Wales is Llandudno's Llys Helyg Drive, with an average property price of £1.064m.

The Scores, St Andrews, tops Scotland's list with an average of almost £2.2m.

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Eaton Square made it to the top of the property stack based on recorded land registry prices.

Built in the 19th Century around a private garden, it features stucco white facades and is handy for Knightsbridge and Chelsea.

It is one of three squares developed by the Grosvenor family following the end of the Napoleonic wars and the conversion of Buckingham House into a palace for King George IV.

Eaton Square takes its name from Eaton Hall in Cheshire, the country home of the Duke of Westminster.

It has boasted numerous famous residents including ex-prime ministers Neville Chamberlain and Stanley Baldwin as well as actress Vivien Leigh, former Bond star Sean Connery and TV cook Nigella Lawson.

A £55m seven bedroom terrace, complete with a winter garden and retractable glass ceiling, on Eaton Square was the most-viewed home for online property website Rightmove in 2016.

The townhouse, which is listed with Knight Frank, also comes with a swimming pool, six bathrooms and a double garage.

Image copyright Knight Frank
Image caption A property on Eaton Square was the most viewed home on Rightmove in 2016
Image copyright Rightmove
Image caption The townhouse features a swimming pool and retractable glass ceiling
Image copyright Knight Frank
Image caption It is on the market for £55m
Image copyright Knight Frank
Image caption The house interior features several chandeliers
Image copyright Frank Knight
Image caption It also comes with a winter garden
Image copyright Knight Frank
Image caption One of seven bedrooms in the property

Outside London, addresses in Surrey and Oxshott - the home of Wimbledon champion and Sports Personality of the Year Andy Murray - feature in the top 20 most expensive residential streets, along with Poole and Oxford.

North of London, England's most expensive address is Park Lane, Altrincham, with an average property price of just over £2m.


Most expensive address in your region:

Image copyright Google
Image caption Farquhar Road in Birmingham is the most expensive street in the West Midlands, with an average value of £1,434,000 per home
  • London: Eaton Square, Westminster - £16,944,000
  • South East: Camp End Road, Weybridge - £5,164,000
  • South West: Panorama Road, Poole - £4,618,000
  • North West: Park Lane, Altrincham - £2,059,000
  • East: Storeys Way, Cambridge - £1,914,000
  • West Midlands: Farquhar Road, Birmingham - £1,434,000
  • Yorkshire and the Humber: Ling Lane, Leeds - £1,319,000
  • East Midlands: Warren Hill, Leicester - £1,288,000
  • North East: Runnymede Road, Newcastle Upon Tyne - £1,103,000
  • Scotland: The Scores, St Andrews - £2,179,000
  • Wales: Llys Helyg Drive, Llandudno - £1,064,000

Wales has two streets with average property prices in excess of £1m - Llys Helyg Drive in Llandudno, where homes typically fetch £1,064,000, and St Anne's Close in Swansea where average properties go for £1,029,000.

Scotland figures were produced by the Bank of Scotland. Although the top spot went to a street leading to the first tee of St Andrew's Old Course, 10 of Scotland's most expensive streets are in Edinburgh.

Forecasters at the Royal Chartered Institute of Surveyors are predicting a 3% typical price rise for houses next year, in spite of Brexit uncertainties.

The Nationwide Building Society is more cautious, estimating prices will grow at 2%, fuelled by continuing low interest rates.

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