England

Thames Valley Police misconduct offences include violence and sex assault

Six police officers were sacked for offences ranging from sexual assault to uploading pornography, Thames Valley Police has revealed.

Other offences included coercing a suspect to admit a crime he had not committed, damaging a vehicle while drunk, and the theft of soft drinks.

The figures come from misconduct hearings held between January and November.

The force said 11 other officers received final written warnings.

A further 10 were given standard written warnings, eight received management advice, and three left the force.

Det Ch Supt Tim De Meyer, the head of the force's professional standards department, said it took allegations of misconduct "extremely seriously".

Misconduct cases:

  • In May a constable was dismissed without notice after he reported his car stolen and made a false insurance claim after arranging its disposal.
  • In June a sergeant received a final written warning for failing to progress an investigation into sexual activity with a 14-year-old girl.
  • Also in June a constable was given a final written warning for being rude and aggressive to a motorist, and threatening the use of his police baton, while a child was in the vehicle.
  • In July a constable received a final written warning for working as a chauffeur, despite being on light duties and claiming an inability to drive following an injury.

Out of 64 misconduct hearings, 24 resulted in the allegations being found not proven, and in one no further action was taken

Of those remaining, 30 involved constables, five concerned special constables, and four dealt with sergeants.

A spokesman said the force and the Independent Police Complaints Commission deal with more than 1,000 investigations each year, the vast majority of which find that the officer has done nothing wrong.

He said only the most serious matters were referred to misconduct hearings, which are held in public and presided over by independent, legally-qualified chairs.

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