UK weather: Hottest day of the year as temperatures to rise further

By Andre Rhoden-Paul
BBC News

  • Published
Related Topics
Punting in Cambridge on 16 JuneImage source, PA Media
Image caption,
People punted along the River Cam in Cambridge as the day grew hotter

The UK has recorded its hottest day of the year so far, with temperatures set to rise on Friday, the Met Office said.

Northolt, west London, saw temperatures reach 29.5C (85.1F), surpassing the previous hottest day of the year on Wednesday which saw 28.2C (82.8F).

On Friday the mercury is expected to rise to 34C in the south east of England, exceeding temperatures in parts of Jamaica and the Maldives.

Across most of England and Wales, highs of between 27C and 30C are expected.

The Met Office said the "unusual" temperatures for June were a result of high pressure over the southern half of the UK and a south-westerly airflow bringing warm air across the UK and Europe.

The weather has not yet beaten the record for the hottest June day ever, which was a high of 35.6C at Southampton Mayflower Park in June 1976.

Image source, PA Media
Image caption,
A woman takes a selfie in a field of poppies in Bramford, Suffolk
Image source, PA Media
Image caption,
At South Kensington Underground Station commuters were warned to carry water with them

It comes after the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) and Met Office issued a level three heat-health alert for London, the south-east and east of England, with the alert remaining in place until midnight on Saturday.

Agostinho Sousa, head of extreme events and health protection at the UKHSA, said: "During periods of hot weather, it is especially important to keep checking on those who are most vulnerable, such as older people and those with heart or lung conditions.

"Make sure to look out for signs of heat exhaustion and follow our simple health advice to beat the heat."

A cold front is expected to push across the country from the north through the weekend, bringing a return to average temperatures in places such as Manchester and Leeds, although high temperatures are expected to remain in East Sussex and Kent, with 29C possible.

For an official heatwave to be declared there must be at least three consecutive days with daily maximum temperatures meeting or exceeding the heatwave temperature threshold.

Dr Mark McCarthy, head of the Met Office's National Climate Information Centre, said climate change had increased the average temperatures of UK summers and the likelihood of experiencing more extreme temperatures during hot spells and heatwaves.

He said: "Reaching 34C during June is a rare, but not unprecedented, event in the historical climate records for the UK.

"But if it should happen this week it would be notable that it would have occurred on three days during the last six Junes."

Image source, PA Media
Image caption,
Those lucky enough not to be at work took to Bridlington Beach in Yorkshire
Image source, PA Media
Image caption,
In Soho Square in central London crowds sat in the sun

Related Topics