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Coronavirus: Good Friday update as Boris Johnson's father warns he needs to 'rest up'

Here are five things to bring you up to speed with the coronavirus outbreak this Good Friday.

1. Boris Johnson 'needs to rest up'

The prime minister's father, Stanley Johnson, has been speaking of his "relief" that his son has recovered enough to leave intensive care - but warns he can't be expected to return to work straight away.

Meanwhile, a new public information campaign urges people to stay at home this Easter.

Image copyright HM Government

2. Clothing makers in Asia give a stark warning

Garment manufacturers in Asia say their main problem during the coronavirus pandemic is the unreasonable demands of big clients in the UK and US.

Image copyright Getty Images

3. 'Worst economic crisis since 1930s depression'

It's not just the health impact of the coronavirus outbreak that has experts worried. The head of the International Monetary Fund has said the pandemic will turn global economic growth "sharply negative" this year.

4. Millions lost to virus fraud

British firms and individuals have lost more than £1.86m to coronavirus-related fraud since the crisis began, police tell the BBC - most of that has gone to bogus companies selling non-existent products such as masks and sanitisers.

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Media captionA BBC investigation has found online scams selling fake protective equipment and coronavirus tests

5. 'I'm in lockdown with my long-lost sister'

For more than 40 years, Sue Bremner didn't know her long-lost sister Margaret Hannay even existed. Now the pair are experiencing a coronavirus lockdown together in New Zealand - and making up for lost time.

Image copyright Handout

Don't forget...

You can find more information, advice and guides on our coronavirus page.

And you can read stories about life during the pandemic here.


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