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Royal wedding 2018: Five moments to remember

From Charles taking Doria's hand, to "thank you Pa", here are some moments to remember...

Charles takes Doria's hand

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Media captionThe moment Prince Charles takes Doria Ragland's hand

It's been a tumultuous week for the Markles and the Raglands. Had all gone to plan, Doria Ragland's former husband, Thomas Markle, would have walked their daughter down the aisle.

But he underwent heart surgery this week, putting him out of the picture, while Ms Markle's half-siblings never received an invitation.

The bride's side of St George's Chapel seemed a very lonely place - Doria Ragland was the only member of the family there.

Dressed in a pale green Oscar de la Renta outfit, side-set hat and delicate nose stud, she looked emotional, deep in thought and, at times, a little lost.

So, at the signing of the register, she appeared relieved to take the guiding hand of Prince Charles - on what must have been a daunting and surreal occasion.


'Thank you Pa'

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Media caption'Thank you Pa'

The first glimpse of the groom suggested Prince Harry, in full military regalia, was in typical buoyant spirits, smiling and laughing as he waved to the crowds of well-wishers on his arrival.

But the smile faded, and the emotion of the occasion was etched on his face, as he waited at the altar for his bride to arrive.

As she entered on the arm of his father, Prince Charles, Harry looked close to tears. He mouthed "thank you Pa" to his dad as he took his seat.

During the service, the prince couldn't seem to relax. In contrast, Ms Markle cut a much calmer figure, smiling often and looking into the eyes of her husband-to-be.

It was only once out of the chapel and onto the streets in the carriage procession that Prince Harry seemed to breathe again - and relax.


Seeing the dress

Image copyright REX/Shutterstock

The big reveal came as a burgundy Rolls Royce Phantom pulled up at the foot of the chapel steps.

Out stepped pageboys - Brian and John Mulroney - and then came the bride, trailing a five-metre fine silk veil, embroidered with the flowers of each country in the Commonwealth.

The gap-toothed twins rushed around to lift the veil off the ground as Ms Markle walked alone into the chapel.

To fashion expert Jo Elvin, the sculpted white boat-neck gown by British designer Clare Waight Keller for French fashion house Givenchy, was a stroke of genius.

"It compliments her style that she's known for," she said.

David Emanuel, who designed Princess Diana's dress, said it was "very clever" to include the Commonwealth flowers in the veil.

"I think Diana would have approved."

Image copyright AFP

US bishop steals the show

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Media captionUS bishop wows with his wedding address

The American bishop Michael Curry, invited by Ms Markle, got the guests smiling and giggling in their pews.

Bishop Curry's theme was the power of love, and he soon had his audience falling a little bit in love with him.

Gesticulating in a style far removed from any other royal wedding ceremony, he addressed the audience as "brothers and sisters" and told them: "There's power in love, don't underestimate it."

The bride and groom sat near the preacher, holding hands as he spoke.

And when he went on for too long, carried away by the moment, he told them: "We gotta get you all married!"


The kiss

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Media captionPrince Harry and Meghan share their first kiss on the steps outside St George's Chapel

It's always The Moment in every royal wedding.

Usually on the balcony at Buckingham Palace, this kiss had a rather more low-key, down-to-earth feel about it.

The bride, looking demure, and the prince held hands as they walked out of St George's Chapel and on to the West Steps.

One lip reader says Ms Markle discreetly asked her new husband: "Do we kiss?"

To which the prince quietly replied: "Yeah".

A jubilant crowd, ready with their mobile phones, zoomed in. One for the album.

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