UK

Today: Tuesday 29th January

The government says nursery staff in England will be allowed to look after more children to help cut the cost of childcare. David Cameron has told Francois Hollande that Britain is ready to help France in Africa. And also on the programme, where will fans of The Killing and Borgen get their next TV drama fix - the unlikely answer it seems is Aberystwyth.

This is the running order for the Today programme on BBC Radio 4, as broadcast on Tuesday 29th January.

0615 Business news with Simon Jack on news that the skills gap is getting wider according to the sector skills council Semta, despite a huge jump in the number of people starting apprenticeships in science and engineering.

0626 Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

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Media caption'Worries' over proposed childcare changes in England

0709 Anand Shukla, chief executive of the Daycare Trust, and Today reporter Zubeida Malik examine an announcement from the government that childcare ratios will be relaxed in England to allow nurseries and childminders to look after more children.

0712 Prof Michael Clarke, director of the Royal United Service Institute, the defence think tank, gives analysis on the levels British assistance is going to be provided to the French force in Mali after the prime minister has said he is willing to help.

0718 Business news with Simon Jack.

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Media captionWill Gompertz: Golden age for West End theatres

0721 Will Gompertz, the BBC's arts editor, looks into the extent that theatre attendance figures were affected by the 2012 Olympics.

0723 The Today reporter Andrew Hosken investigates news that the UK is losing 18 pubs a week, and increasingly some are ending up as supermarkets.

0726 Sports news with Rob Bonnet.

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Media captionHas austerity really been tried in Britain?

0733 Andrew Lilico, a director of the consultancy Europe Economics, and Jonathan Portes, the director of the National Institute for Economic and Social Research, debate whether the government's policy of austerity is the best strategy for fiscal stability.

0741 The paper review.

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Media captionActor Richard Harrington: He arrives on the eve of a huge murder

0744 A Welsh production company has sold its new detective series, called Hinterland to Denmark's state broadcaster. Wales correspondent Hywel Griffith investigates from the set.

0747 Thought for the Day with the Right Reverend James Jones, Bishop of Liverpool.

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Media captionFootball 'massively contributes' to British economy

0750 John Whittingdale of the the cross-party culture, media and sport committee, and Peter Coates, chairman of Stoke City discuss whether the system of licensing, the way fans are treated and the finances of English football are satisfactory.

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Media captionLizTruss: This is only the first phase

0810 Elizabeth Truss, Education Minister, and Eva Lloyd of the University of East London, analyse plans to relax the official child to adult ratios in nurseries and other childcare settings.

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Media captionThe Jewish Chronicle's Stephen Pollard and cartoonist Steve Bell argue over the cartoon

0820 Rupert Murdoch himself has apologised for a Gerald Scarfe cartoon in the Sunday Times at the weekend because of the offence it caused the Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu. The drawing showed him building a wall, apparently using the bloody limbs of Palestinians. The cartoon was published on Holocaust Remembrance Day; and Gerald Scarfe "very much" regrets the timing, of which he says he was unaware. Stephen Pollard of the Jewish Chronicle, and Steve Bell, cartoonist in the Guardian, debate.

0828 David Cameron has told Francois Hollande that Britain is ready to help France in Africa. West Africa correspondent, Thomas Fessy reports from Timbuktu, and General Sir Mike Jackson, gives his analysis.

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Media captionKellogg's Paul Wheeler: Over half of breakfasts in the UK are cereals

0835 Business news with Simon Jack. Tony the Tiger, the character that advertised Frosties, has been around for more than 60 years but Kellogg's has not spent a penny on traditional advertising for the brand since 2010. Paul Wheeler, corporate affairs director at Kellogg's explained that this is because of a ban on advertising directly to children. "Over half of breakfasts in the UK are cereals, we feel good about that," he said.

0838 Germany's deputy finance minister, Steffen Kampeter, discusses the euro crisis with Today's Evan Davis.

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Media captionWhy do people cough during concerts?

0844 German economist Andreas Wagener and concert pianist Susan Tomes examine a report that says that people cough more in concerts than in they do in normal life.

0850 Dalia Ben-Galim, associate director of the think tank the IPPR, and Harriet Bradley, professor of women's employment at the University of the West of England, discuss the government's announcements on child care.