Contraception

Why church can make a woman give birth

Religiosity is a bigger fertility drive than religion itself
Jonathan Last, author of What to Expect When No-one’s Expecting, explains how most interventions to increase the fertility rate have failed in countries around the world.
 
While negative incentives seem to work, such as China’s one child policy, encouraging people to have more children seems less successful.
 
As Last explains, a far larger influence on a woman’s decision to have more children than race, education or geography, is how often she attends religious services.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)

Jamelia: Teenage daughter was my birthing partner

Jamelia thought having daughter as birth partner would be brilliant form of contraception
Singer and presenter Jamelia thought having her teenage daughter as birthing partner would be 'brilliant' form of contraception, but it wasn't that simple.

"I have the same conversation with my 13-year-old actually," said the mum of three.

"You're not here and you do not have to reproduce if you don't want to. You don't have to be a mum if you don't want to.

"The life that you have is yours."

[Picture credit: mn2s.com]

A phone app for birth control

Physicist Elina Berglund on why she developed the world's first contraceptive app.
Physicist Elina Berglund on why she developed the world's first contraceptive app. Natural Cycles tells women how fertile they are on different days. It took 4% of the contraceptive market when it was launched in Sweden, but has encountered resistance from regulators and makers of conventional contraceptive methods.

(Photo: Natural Cycles user interface, Credit: Natural Cycles)