Heart

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  3. Made of Stronger Stuff: The Heart

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    Video caption: Kimberley Wilson and Xand van Tulleken talk artificial hearts and broken heart syndrome.

    Psychologist Kimberley Wilson and Dr Xand van Tulleken take a journey around the human body. This time: the ticker, the pump, the horse and cart… the heart!

  4. The Heart

    Video content

    Video caption: Kimberley Wilson and Xand van Tulleken talk artificial hearts and broken heart syndrome.

    Psychologist Kimberley Wilson and Dr Xand van Tulleken take a journey around the human body. This time: the ticker, the pump, the horse and cart… the heart!

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  6. Heart rhythm treatment pioneered at hospital

    Greig Watson

    Reporter, BBC News Online

    A new heart procedure - the first of its kind in the UK - has been carried out in Leicester.

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the irregular beating of the heart, affects more than one million people in the UK and can leave sufferers with palpitations and increased chance of strokes.

    One of the treatments is ablation - the freezing or burning of multiple tiny parts of the heart - using a probe.

    Standard ablation can take 30-40 seconds per 'burn', totalling more than an hour for the treatment and around three hours for the whole procedure.

    Computer image of operation

    But surgeons at Leicester hospitals have begun to use new technology which reduces each 'burn' time to three to four seconds.

    Professor Andre Ng, consultant cardiologist at Leicester hospitals, said: "The new technology is likely to transform our practice.

    "It greatly reduces the time needed for each ablation and hence the procedure as a whole, as the catheter no longer needs to stay at each spot for a long time.

    "This is great news for patients, as the time in theatre is significantly reduced."

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