Food industry

Is big business truly embracing organic?

Do some of the principles of organic farming get lost when big brands get involved?
Demand for organic food globally is outstripping supply and a growing number of big food companies are moving into the sector by buying up organic farms and brands. But do the principles of organic farming get lost when big brands get involved? General Mills, maker of Cheerios cereals and Nature Valley bars, is one of the biggest organic producers in the US. Emily Thomas speaks to Carla Vernon, President of  Natural and Organic at General Mills.
(Image: Man in field holding a briefcase Credit: Getty Images)

Restaurants should list all ingredients - UK regulator

Sandwiches
Getty Images

The Food Standards Agency has decided to recommend changes in the labelling of ready to eat food, to highlight the dangers of allergens.

At the moment food prepared on the same site as it is sold, doesn't have to have warning labels about allergens, because it is assumed anyone who needs to know will ask the staff who made it about the food's ingredients.

The flaw in that system was exposed by the death of 15 year old Natasha Ednan-Laperouse who collapsed after eating a baquette from Pret a Manger which contained sesame seeds, to which she was allergic.

Pret a Manger has already started rolling out full labelling on all its products in its stores.

HelloFresh customers jump 32%

HelloFresh box
HelloFresh

Meal-kit provider HelloFresh has posted a 42% rise in first-quarter sales as the number of active customers jumped 32% to 2.5 million.

That growth has been supported by a strong development of its three US brands, including the successful ramp-up of the more recent EveryPlate and Green Chef brands.

That's good news for the Berlin-based firm, but sadly its losses have climbed 66% from €13.7m to €22.7m.

Boss and co-founder Dominik Richter remained upbeat, saying: "Based on our first quarter we can confidently reconfirm our full year guidance."

How much food waste do we produce?
A university lecturer uses apples to demonstrate how much food ends up in landfill.