Blackpool Council

Election results for 2019

    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    23
    23
    -6
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    15
    15
    +2
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    4
    4
    +4

Most Recent

Blackpool Council underspent by £1m despite pressures

Local Democracy Reporting Service

Blackpool Council underspent by £1m in the last financial year despite financial pressure on key departments including children's services.

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Spending during 2018/19 added up to £127.4m compared to £128.5m which had been budgeted for.

Steve Thompson, director of resources at Blackpool Council, said: "Despite the significant demand pressures being faced in children's social care, the financial performance of all our other services was remarkable in that they managed to exceed their budget savings targets to more than compensate for this whilst maintaining high standards of service delivery."

The council cut its 2018/19 budget by £5.5m, and has reduced spending in the current financial year by a further £9m.

Election results: Counting under way in Blackpool

Counting has started in Blackpool in this year's local elections.

Chorley was the only Lancashire council to declare overnight where Labour retained control, gaining five seats from the Conservatives.

Results results expected later in Blackburn, Darwen, Burnley, Blackpool, Fylde, Hyndburn, Lancaster, Pendle, Preston, Rossendale, Ribble Valley, Wyre and West Lancashire.

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Have the poorest councils had the biggest cuts?

Reality Check

The BBC's Reality Check team looks at Labour's claim that the most deprived council areas of England have seen more cuts than their better-off neighbours.

Labour said it looked at the spending power of the 10 most deprived council areas, according to an official ranking published every few years by the government - most recently in 2015.

Those areas include Blackpool, Burnley, Knowsley, Liverpool and Manchester.

BBC analysis suggests that all 10 listed areas saw higher than average cuts and for nine of them, that cut was at least twice the average.

Since 2010, council spending power, including funding from central government and local taxes, has fallen by almost 30%.

Social housing
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