Forest of Dean District Council

Election results for 2019

    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    14
    14
    +10
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    10
    10
    -6
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    6
    6
    +6
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    5
    5
    -6
    Elected in 2019
    Total
    +/-
    0
    0
    -4

Most Recent

A quarter of children in poverty

Hungry child
Getty Images

About a quarter of children in our region are living in poverty, according to new research.

Among the local authorities facing the highest levels of child poverty, after housing costs are taken into account, are West Somerset with a figure of 31% and Gloucester with a figure of 28%.

The data has been published by the End Child Poverty coalition.

Other figures locally include Bristol (27%), Forest of Dean (26%), South Somerset (25%), Sedgemoor (24%) and Wiltshire (24%).

The Children's Society said the findings were "disappointing".

Without significant additional investment, there is little hope of reducing child poverty rates in coming years.

Sam RoystonThe Children’s Society

Cross-party cabinet to contest local elections

Paul Barltrop

Political Editor, West of England

The unique cross party which has run Forest of Dean District Council since July 2017 is planning to reshape the political landscape.

The coalition is launching the independent Forest Alliance to contest council elections in May.

Council leader Tim Gwilliam, candidates and supporters are gathering at West Dean Centre in Bream this evening.

They like to do things differently in the Forest of Dean – and its politics is no exception. It is hard to imagine councillors from parties at opposite ends of the political spectrum, like UKIP and the Greens, happily sharing power.

But for nearly two years their Rainbow cabinet has run the district council, and they want to take things further.

It’s not without difficulties. Local elections are fought under first-past-the-post rules, which make it very hard for small parties to win seats.

And they haven’t managed to turn friendly cross-party co-operation into a full electoral pact; the Greens haven’t been persuaded not to stand against other independents on May 2nd.

But the cabinet, and its almost accidental leader Tim Gwilliam, hope the Forest’s unique political experiment can go on.