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Summary

  1. Deadly clashes break out in Venezuela's border towns as opposition tries to bring in aid
  2. Troops fire tear gas at crowds trying to break through government blockades
  3. At least one aid truck goes up in flames on the Colombia-Venezuela border
  4. Self-declared interim President Juan Guaidó urges the military to allow aid in
  5. President Nicolás Maduro warns this would open the way for US military intervention
  6. Several members of Venezuela's security forces have defected

Live Reporting

By Mal Siret, Yaroslav Lukov and Francesca Gillett

All times stated are UK

  1. That's all for now

    Opposition supporters clash with Venezuela's security forces at a bridge on the border of Colombia

    That concludes our live coverage for today.

    If you would like to read up on the day's events or know more about the crisis in Venezuela, please check out our coverage:

    Thanks for reading.

  2. 'Yankee go home!' - Maduro

    Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro continues to be defiant in the face of growing international pressure.

    In a tweet (in Spanish), he writes: "Our people have come to the streets of Caracas and all our country with the firm determination to defend the peace of Venezuela and to tell Donald Trump and the American empire: Yankee Go Home!"

    Mr Maduro also posted pictures of his supporters rallying in Venezuela today.

    View more on twitter
  3. In pictures: Demonstrators take to the streets

    A vehicle is set alight in Pacaraima, Brazil, near the border with Venezuela
    Image caption: A vehicle is set alight in Pacaraima, Brazil, near the border with Venezuela
    An opposition supporter looks on amid clashes with Venezuela's security forces at Francisco de Paula Santander bridge on the border with Colombia
    Image caption: An opposition supporter looks on amid debris and a burnt truck following clashes with Venezuela's security forces at the border with Colombia
    Demonstrators throw stones at the Venezuelan security forces on a bridge linking Cucuta, Colombia, and Ureña, Venezuela
    Image caption: Demonstrators throw stones at the Venezuelan security forces on a bridge linking Cucuta, Colombia, and Ureña, Venezuela
    Supporters of Juan Guaidó take part in a rally in Caracas to demand President Nicolás Maduro allows humanitarian aid to enter the country
    Image caption: Supporters of Juan Guaidó take part in a rally in Caracas to demand President Nicolás Maduro allows humanitarian aid to enter the country
  4. The bridge of desperation

    A demonstrator gestures in front of Venezuelan national police standing guard at the Simón Bolívar International Bridge

    Many Venezuelans have for years been trying to escape their crisis-hit country and enter Colombia over the Simón Bolívar bridge.

    So, if you want to know more about the so-called "bridge of desperation", here's a long-read by the BBC's Katy Watson.

  5. Death toll rises to four - reports

    Four people are now said to have died in clashes today in the city of Santa Elena de Uairén at the Venezuela-Brazil border.

    Media reports, citing human rights groups and local hospital officials, say more than 20 people were also injured when Venezuelan security forces opened fire on demonstrators.

  6. Maduro to Colombia's president: 'You are the devil'

    Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro speaks during a pro-government rally in Caracas

    At a rally in the Venezuelan capital, Caracas, President Nicolás Maduro expressed his anger at his Colombian counterpart.

    "Never before [has] a Colombian president fallen so far and done what Iván Duque has done against Venezuela," he said. "Never before. Never.

    "He seems innocent, with an angelic face, but I would grab his cheeks and tell him you are the devil, Iván Duque. You are the devil."

  7. Whites vs reds - rival rallies in Caracas

    BBC's Katy Watson in Caracas

    Opposition supporters march in Caracas
    Image caption: Opposition supporters march in Caracas

    While tensions flared on Venezuela’s borders, there was relative calm in the capital, Caracas.

    Thousands of people turned up for an opposition march, many dressed in white, a symbol of peace.

    "More medicine, fewer bullets," read one of the signs carried by the demonstrators. Another read: "Maduro, you’re the cancer of Venezuela."

    The crowd marched to the military barracks - all part of a strategy to pressure the armed forces to side with Juan Guaidó and let the humanitarian aid in.

    One woman described today as "breaking point" for Maduro.

    It’s certainly a test for the president. But apart from a handful of defections at the border, so far his senior officers have remained loyal.

    Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro waves the national flag during a pro-government march in Caracas
    Image caption: President Maduro waves the national flag during a pro-government march in Caracas

    And there are still those who back Maduro over what they say is a trojan horse in the form of US humanitarian aid.

    Not far away from the opposition march, Chavistas and government workers gathered, many dressed in red - the colours of the president’s socialist party.

    "Hands off Venezuela", was the message from here.

    "If they want to help, lift all the sanctions against our country," state worker Frank Marchan told me. "We don’t need their mercy."

  8. More images from burning truck

    Opposition supporters unload humanitarian aid from a truck that was set on fire after clashes with Venezuelan security forces

    Supporters of Juan Guaidó are trying to save humanitarian aid on board a burning truck on a bridge at the border line between Colombia and Venezuela.

    Boxes of aid are removed from a burning truck at the Venezuelan border
    People try to save pallets of supplies from a burning truck
  9. Maduro 'can't break ties with Colombia'

    Juan Guaidó (R) with Luis Almagro in Cucuta, Colombia, on Saturday
    Image caption: Juan Guaidó (R) with Luis Almagro in Cucuta, Colombia, on Saturday

    According to Reuters, Luis Almagro, the secretary general of the Organization of American States (OAS), has said President Maduro is not in a position to break relations with Colombia because he is not Venezuela's legitimate president.

    The OAS was founded in 1948 as a body to promote regional solidarity and co-operation. It has 34 participating member states in the Caribbean and North, Central and South America.

    In the same statement, Colombia's foreign minister, Carlos Holmes Trujillo, said: "Colombia holds the usurper Maduro responsible for any aggression or violation of the rights of Colombian officials in Venezuela."

  10. Second death at Brazil border - reports

    News agencies are now reporting that a second person has died at the border with Brazil (see previous post at 19:47).

    The incident occurred during a confrontation between crowds and Venezuelan security forces in the of Santa Elena de Uairén.

    This comes after two people were killed near the border with Brazil on Friday.

  11. BreakingAid truck goes up in flames

    People unload humanitarian aid from a truck that caught fire on the Venezuela-Colombia border

    One truck carrying humanitarian aid went up in flames at the Colombia-Venezuela border, footage from Venezuelan TV showed.

    Images showed people were removing boxes of supplies from a second vehicle at Francisco de Paula Santander bridge.

    People remove aid from a burning truck at Francisco de Paula Santander bridge

    Juan Guaidó later accused the "usurper's regime" of trying to burn the truck, but added that "brave volunteers" were acting to protect the aid.

    View more on twitter
  12. One dead at border - media

    Venezuelan newspaper Correo del Caroní is reporting that one person has died and several others have been injured during clashes at the border with Brazil.

    The report states a 26-year-old man died in hospital as a result of wounds sustained when national guard officers released tear gas and fired shots in the Venezuelan border city of Santa Elena de Uairén.

    View more on twitter
  13. Maduro dances in Caracas

    Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro dances with his wife Cilia Flores in Caracas

    President Nicolás Maduro and his wife Cilia Flores danced to cheering crowds of supporters during a pro-government rally in the Venezuelan capital, Caracas, on Saturday.

    The move was criticised by some on social media, who pointed out that it came during fierce clashes at the country's borders with Colombia and Brazil.

    View more on twitter
  14. BreakingMaduro cuts ties with Colombia

    President Maduro says he has cut relations with neighbouring Colombia, according to Reuters.

    He has expelled diplomatic staff from the Colombian embassy.

    "Patience is exhausted," he said in a speech, adding: "I can't bear it anymore, we can't keep putting up with Colombian territory being used for attacks against Venezuela.

    "For that reason, I have decided to break all political and diplomatic relations with Colombia's fascist government."

    President Maduro said the diplomatic staff would leave Venezuela within 24 hours.

  15. Why is the military backing Maduro?

    President Maduro has put on a public display of unity with senior military officers

    President Maduro's position looks shaky, but the military may still have reasons to keep him in power.

    The armed forces have played a key role in supporting his government, with many officers holding posts as ministers or other influential positions.

    If holding lucrative positions is one incentive for members of the armed forces to keep Mr Maduro in power, the fear of being held to account could be another.

    The UN has accused Venezuelan security forces of carrying out hundreds of arbitrary killings under the guise of fighting crime and some officers are accused of serious humans rights violations.

    Read more here.

  16. More pictures from the bridges

    A tanker trailer blocking the Tienditas bridge in the border line between Colombia and Venezuela is seen from the outskirts of Cucuta, Colombia
    Image caption: A tanker trailer blocks the Tienditas bridge on the border between Colombia and Venezuela
    Demonstrators clash with Venezuelan national police at the Simon Bolivar bridge, in Cucuta, Colombia
    Image caption: A demonstrator clashes with Venezuelan security officers at the Simón Bolívar bridge at the border with Cúcuta
    Also at the Simón Bolívar bridge, a demonstrator takes shelter behind an improvised shield
    Image caption: Also at the Simón Bolívar bridge, a demonstrator takes shelter behind an improvised shield
  17. Tear gas forces protesters to retreat

    Journalist Dylan Baddour has tweeted images showing protesters at the Simón Bolívar bridge covering their faces and retreating as tear gas is reportedly released nearby.

    View more on twitter
    View more on twitter

    Independent Venezuelan news website Efecto Cocuyo later tweeted a photo which it said showed an ambulance transporting protesters wounded at the bridge to a nearby hospital.

    View more on twitter
  18. In pictures: The Brazil-Venezuelan border

    Evangelical demonstrators gather at the border between Venezuela and Brazil in Pacaraima, Roraima state, Brazil
    Image caption: Protesters have also been rallying on the Venezuela-Brazil border, more than 1,000km away from the Colombia frontier.
    People cheer as trucks with humanitarian aid to Venezuela approach the Brazil-Venezuela border in Pacaraima, Roraima state
    Image caption: People cheered as trucks with humanitarian aid to Venezuela approached Pacaraima, in Brazil's northernmost Roraima state
    People walk with their belongings through a field, as they try to cross the border between Venezuela and Brazil in Pacaraima, Roraima
    Image caption: Some Venezuelans walked with their belongings through a field, as they tried to cross into Brazil
  19. Venezuela crisis: How did we get here?

    Nicolás Maduro (left) and Juan Guaidó

    Venezuela's spiralling political and economic crisis may look confusing - as many actors both internal and external are involved.

    So, let's take a closer look at what's behind the turmoil.