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Summary

  1. Jersey's 2019 budget approved
  2. Permission granted for islands' 'biggest solar array'
  3. Decline of crabs in Jersey 'could lead to restrictions'
  4. Calls to Guernsey St John Ambulance up on last two years
  5. States Assembly awarded 'Plastic-free Parliament' status
  6. Yellow weather warning for wind across the islands
  7. Updates on Thursday 6 December 2018

Live Reporting

All times stated are UK

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  1. Pre-strike pay offer issued to public sector workers

    Rob England

    BBC News Online

    On the eve of strike action, some public sector workers in Jersey have been offered revised pay deals by the government.

    Nurses, midwives, manual workers and teaching assistants employed by the States of Jersey could be affected.

    Under the offer:

    • Nurses and midwives would see their pay go up by 6.1% over two years
    • Manual and energy recovery facility staff have been offered a bigger increase of 6.7%
    • Teaching assistants would see their pay rise at the same rate as teachers, 2%

    Civil servants are due to march on Liberation Square tomorrow morning, weeks after their pay deal was imposed upon them.

    Terry Renouf, from the Prospect union, says the new deal is "a further insult" to the pay negotiations.

    Video content

    Video caption: Pay deal offered to workers in Jersey ahead of strike action
  2. Weather: A cloudy and mild night ahead

    BBC Weather

    Tonight will remain rather cloudy and mild, with patchy drizzle likely during the first half of the night.

    It will be drier for a time in the early hours, but more widespread and heavy rain is likely later.

    Overnight lows of 12C (53F).

    Jersey:

    weather

    Guernsey:

    weather
  3. Locate Guernsey: 'Inquiries up 56%'

    Rob Byrne

    BBC News Online

    Locate Guernsey, the government-funded body which helps wealthy individuals move to the island, has seen inquiries increase by 56% in the second half of 2018.

    The prospect of a Labour government has reportedly led to more wealthy UK residents inquiring about moving to Guernsey. The party is committed to increasing taxes on the top 5% of UK earners.

    It is not known exactly how many relocation inquiries the 56% rise in the second half of the year compared to the first six months relates to, as Locate Guernsey did not provide the information when asked by the BBC.

    St Peter Port

    It comes after a Guernsey estate agent reported a surge in sales on the island's open market - designed to attract newcomers, after tax incentives introduced earlier this year.

    Swoffers has sold 20 houses in the past six weeks on the island's open market, it said, with the majority of its clients coming from outside Guernsey.

    Shauna Clapham from the company said there were "many reasons" why people were relocating, but "uncertainty in the UK over Brexit and the possibility of a general election and change of government is making them look further afield," she said.

    Jersey has also seen 27 "high value residents" arrive in the island this year, seven more than in 2017.

  4. Prisoners to turn old school bus into children's library

    Hayley Westcott

    BBC News Online

    La Moye prisoners with a background in carpentry are set to work on transforming a disused school bus into an additional library for Haute Vallée School.

    It's hoped the library – which has been designed by the students – will engage more young people in literacy, as well as giving prisoners an opportunity to contribute to the community as part of La Moye’s restorative justice programme.

    The bus had been operating in Jersey as a standard bus since 1994 but became a school bus in 2007.

    prison sign
    Image caption: Prisoners from La Moye will transform the bus into a library
    Quote Message: With our heavy investment in literacy and reading, our plans to redevelop the school library into a study zone and having a quirky library bus, I am positive we will get students talking and thinking more about literacy. We are also pleased that students can see how schools can work alongside businesses and groups such as prisoners to create something beneficial for the school community. from Stuart Hughes Haute Vallée School head teacher
    Stuart HughesHaute Vallée School head teacher
  5. Gale force eight winds expected across the islands

    Hayley Westcott

    BBC News Online

    An orange weather warning for wind has been issued across the islands, Jersey Met has said.

    It added gales of force eight can be expected later.

    weather warning
  6. Putin critic welcomes "dirty"money law

    Rob Byrne

    BBC News Online

    A high-profile critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin has welcomed a new law to prevent "dirty" money flowing into Jersey.

    Island politicians today unanimously approved the Sanctions and Asset Freezing (Jersey) Law.

    US-born financier Bill Browder said it would have an "enormous" effect, describing it as the island's own "Magnitsky Act".

    A number of countries have passed similar laws which target human rights violators, named after Mr Browder's former lawyer Sergei Magnitsky.

    Under the move, the island's government can now adopt elements of UK law, further extending sanctions powers in addition to existing UN and EU provisions.

    Bill Browder

    Mr Browder said: "This will have an enormous effect because Jersey keeps £300bn worth of assets, some of which are human rights violators and kleptocrats hiding behind shells.

    "Whether it's the intention of the Jersey parliament to go after human rights violators or not, the impact of this will be enormous in the future because so much money is kept in Jersey," he added.

    Promotional body Jersey Finance previously said there was "no evidence" of assets being hidden in the island.

  7. Cargo aircraft's levers froze on approach to airport

    Del Crookes

    BBC News Online

    The flight controls and power levers of a cargo plane travelling from East Midlands Airport to the Channel Islands froze near the end of the journey, according to an Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) investigation.

    The incident happened on 14 February as the aircraft started its descent into Guernsey Airport.

    A trainee pilot tried to right the plane as it banked to the left sharply with its nose down, before the commander managed to return the aircraft to a safe flight path.

    Guernsey Airport

    As the aircraft descended, the flight controls and power levers returned to normal and a safe landing was carried out, according to the report.

    Manufacturer, BAE Systems, said it had reissued advice relating to wear in a locking mechanism and the purging of moisture from engine control cables.

  8. 'Hundreds' of Jersey driving licences expired

    BBC Radio Jersey

    Hundreds of Jersey's motorists are driving with expired licences, it's been revealed.

    Despite parish officials reminding people, 400 driving licences that expired in October and November have not yet been renewed.

    It's an offence to drive with an expired licence and if caught, there are risks of heavy fines and driving bans.

    Danny Scaife, chairman of the Chefs de Police committee, says it's a "minor inconvenience" to not drive while waiting for a new licence - compared to "ending up in court just before Christmas".

    He added people can apply for a new licence online or pick up a paper application from local parish halls.

    person driving car
  9. Permission granted for islands' 'biggest solar array'

    Del Crookes

    BBC News Online

    Planning permission has been granted for the largest solar array in the Channel Islands.

    Guernsey Electricity and Guernsey Post announced plans for the installation in October.

    Chief executive of Guernsey Electricity, Alan Bates (left) and chief executive of Guernsey Post, Boley Smilie
    Image caption: Chief executive of Guernsey Electricity, Alan Bates, and chief executive of Guernsey Post, Boley Smilie

    It will be built on the roof of Guernsey Post’s headquarters at Envoy House, and will be approximately 200kW in size.

    It will produce around 200,000 kWh of electricity each year.

    The energy, equivalent to the amount needed to power Guernsey Post’s entire fleet of electric vehicles, will be directed to the electricity grid for island-wide use.

    Following a tender process, it is hoped that the installation of the solar array will take place in the first half of 2019.

  10. Jersey's 2019 budget approved

    Freddie Miller

    BBC Jersey political reporter

    Jersey's 2019 budget has been approved, with just two of 45 politicians voting against the financial plan.

    Over the past two-and-a-half days politicians have been debating the final wording.

    Treasury Minister Deputy Susie Pinel described her plan as a "steady as you go budget", with no major shocks or surprises.

    Under it, there will be a 3.5% rise in alcohol duty, a rise in income tax allowances and stamp duty relief for first-time buyers.

    Three proposed changes were rejected by the assembly, including an attempt to redraw the island's tax system.

    Just two Reform Jersey politicians voted against the plans - assistant ministers Montfort Tadier and Geoff Southern.

    The budget will come into effect on 1 January.

  11. Decline of crabs in Jersey 'could lead to restrictions'

    BBC Radio Jersey

    There could be restrictions on people fishing for crabs in the future if species in Jersey continue to decline.

    Jersey's environment minister has agreed to relax the restrictions on bass fishing as part of scientific research work.

    But the Jersey Fisherman's Association is concerned those restrictions have caused a fall in the stocks of lobster and crab - as fishermen looked for other catches.

    Deputy John Young said wants to "find out why the species are declining in other parts of the world" before any decisions are made.

    crab
    Quote Message: The crab seems to be in significant decline. Nobody knows the reason - we are relying on researchers to try and establish that reason. I think - inevitably - if the species continues declining, there will have to be restrictions on that. from Deputy John Young States of Jersey
    Deputy John YoungStates of Jersey
  12. Calls to Guernsey St John Ambulance up on last two years

    BBC Radio Guernsey

    St John Emergency Ambulance Service in Guernsey has received 5,000 calls so far this year - more than in each of the two previous years.

    In the whole of 2017, the service responded to less than 4,900 calls, whilst in 2016 less than 4,000 calls were recorded across the entire year.

    Demand this year peaked in March, with 531 calls across the month.

    The service said it's due to demand on the service continuing to grow. Extra staff have had to be called back to help, under a voluntary arrangement.

    St John Ambulance
  13. Maya makes Brighton debut

    Brent Pilnick

    BBC Sport

    Guernsey's England youth international Maya Le Tissier has made her debut for WSL side Brighton and Hove Albion.

    Maya Le Tissier

    The 16-year-old played the full 90 minutes as her side beat Crystal Place 5-1 in the Continental Tyres Cup.

    Le Tissier has yet to make her league debut for the Seagulls, but has featured as an unused substitute.

  14. Weather warning issued ahead of high tide on Friday

    Hayley Westcott

    BBC News Online

    There's a chance wind and wave conditions will combine with high tides and cause "spillage over sea walls with debris being thrown on Jersey's roads" on Friday.

    Jersey Met said high tide is at 06:11 and people along the south coast should be cautious.

    coastal warning
  15. Visit Jersey defends pay given to its directors

    BBC Radio Jersey

    The head of the body that promotes Jersey tourism has defended the pay given to its directors - after it was questioned in a new report.

    The comptroller and auditor general, Karen McConnell - who reviews States accounts - said Visit Jersey directors were paid more than executives in Visit Britain - a £1,000 a day for 12 days work.

    Karen McConnell was also concerned there weren't enough checks to see what taxpayers got back from the £5m it costs to run Visit Jersey every year.

    But chief executive of organisation, Keith Beecham said Visit Jersey has been successful and pays its officers a suitable amount for the work they do....

    Video content

    Video caption: Visit Jersey has defended the pay given to its directors