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Live Reporting

By Louise Wilson and Craig Hutchison

All times stated are UK

  1. That's all from Holyrood Live

    Witness

    That's all from Holyrood Live on Tuesday 17 September 2019.

    Deputy Chief Inspector of Prisons Stephen Sandham told MSPs he was "extremely concerned" about the dramatic rise in the prison population.

    It rose by 9% in the year ending March, the equivalent of one additional large prison.

    Mr Sandham told the Justice Committee: "We think it's got quite a profound and quite a worrying impact."

    Phil Fairlie from the Prison Officers Association Scotland was also concerned about increasing violence levels, with a doubling of serious assaults and a 60% increase in staff absence levels.

    Elsewhere, Health Secretary Jeane Freeman has announced in inquiry into safety issues at the new children's hospital in Edinburgh and the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow.

    It comes ahead of a Scottish Tory debate on NHS infrastructure tomorrow.

  2. Minister praises ' tireless work' of Macmillan staff, nurses and volunteers

    Parliamentary Business Minister Graeme Dey
    Image caption: Parliamentary Business Minister Graeme Dey

    Parliamentary Business Minister Graeme Dey points to the partnership between Macmillan Cancer Support and the Scottish government in creating an £18m scheme which aims to guarantee that patients have someone to turn to when they need help.

    He says the Coffee Morning, all told, has raised £200m to help cancer patients, a phenomenon.

    It is simple and easy for anyone and everyone to get involved adds Mr Dey and he encourages fellow MSPs to do just that.

    He concludes saying he cannot thank the the extraordinary Macmillan staff, nurses and volunteers enough, for their tireless work to help cancer patients.

  3. Background: Scottish cancer patients to have dedicated support worker

    More than 30,000 people in Scotland are diagnosed with cancer every year
    Image caption: More than 30,000 people in Scotland are diagnosed with cancer every year

    Cancer patients in Scotland are to be given a dedicated support worker who can help provide one-to-one emotional, practical and financial advice.

    The £18m scheme aims to guarantee that patients have someone to turn to when they need help.

    And it hopes to free up hospital cancer care teams to focus solely on the provision of medical care and support.

    It is being funded by the Scottish government and MacMillan Cancer Support.

    Read more here.

    Nicola Sturgeon announced details of the scheme at a cancer centre in Glasgow
    Image caption: Nicola Sturgeon announced details of the scheme at a cancer centre in Glasgow
  4. Praise for Macmillan nurses and volunteers

    Clare Adamson

    Clare Adamson says the World Coffee Morning is in its 29th year and in that time has raised over £200m for services for those effected by cancer.

    She thanks the Macmillan volunteers and the various ways people can volunteer.

    Macmillan nurses work in partnership with the NHS to deliver vital support and information, she states.

  5. Here's Clare Adamson's motion........

    Here's the motion
    Image caption: Here's the motion
  6. BreakingGovernment announces public inquiry into new Edinburgh Sick Kids' and QEUH sites

    New children's hospital in Edinburgh

    A public inquiry will be held to examine issues at the new children's hospital in Edinburgh and the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow following recent concerns from affected parents over safety and wellbeing.

    The £150m Royal Hospital for Children and Young People was due to open this summer but has been delayed until 2020 amid safety issues.

    The building shares the same main contractor and design as the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow, which has also had problems with ventilation systems.

    The inquiry will determine how vital issues relating to ventilation and other key building systems occurred, and what steps can be taken to prevent this being repeated in future projects.

    Health Secretary Jeane Freeman said: "Following calls from affected parents, I am announcing a public inquiry to examine the new Royal Hospital for Children and Young People and the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital sites."

  7. Macmillan Cancer Support's World's Biggest Coffee Morning debate

    McMillan Cancer Support
    Image caption: McMillan Cancer Support

    SNP MSP Clare Adamson will now lead a member's debate supporting Macmillan Cancer Support’s World’s Biggest Coffee Morning fundraiser.

    It runs throughout September every year and since 1990 it has raised over £200 million.

    Ms Adamson will point to the recent announcement that the Scottish government and Macmillan are each investing £9 million into the Transforming Cancer Care programme to make Scotland the first country in the UK to offer cancer patients guaranteed emotional, practical and financial advice.

  8. Government motion on family migration agreed

    The Tory amendment on family migration policy is not agreed (30 for and 82 against).

    The Scottish government's unamended motion is passed, with 84 backing it and 29 voting against.

    Govt motion
  9. MSPs agree government motion on credit unions as amended

    Government

    MSPs unanimously back the motion from the government on credit unions, as amended by the Labour amendment below.

    It too received unanimous backing.

    Labour amendment
  10. Background: Migration from EU to UK lowest for four years, ONS figures show

    People

    The number of people moving to the UK from EU countries was the lowest it has been for nearly four years in 2017.

    But there was a rise in those coming from outside the EU, the Office for National Statistics said, with net migration the highest since 2011.

    Overall net migration, the difference between the number of people coming to live in the UK for at least 12 months and those emigrating, was 282,000.

    The government wants to cut overall net migration to the tens of thousands.

    The ONS data is for the first full calendar year since the Brexit vote.

    While the overall net migration was up by 33,000 on the previous year, statisticians said the figure was "broadly stable".

  11. Background: EU migration rules 'to end straight after no-deal'

    Airport

    The UK government has said EU free movement rules will end immediately if there is a no-deal Brexit on 31 October.

    Theresa May had considered phasing out the rules if the UK leaves the EU without an agreement, but those plans have now been dropped.

    The change would affect the rights of EU citizens who arrive in the UK from November onwards.

    A Lib Dem MP has criticised the move as "irresponsible and reckless".

    Read more here.

  12. Lives turned upside down due to Home Office 'racism' - Harvie

    Scottish Green co-leader Patrick Harvie

    Scottish Green co-leader Patrick Harvie says the Scottish government's motion this afternoon does not capture the reality of the UK government's policy on migration.

    At least 83 members of the Windrush generation were deported and the Home Office has been unable to contact 42 of them, Mr Harvie.

    People's lives have been turned upside down because of the "racism of the Home Office" he argues.

    The UK government continues to make the hostile environment even worse Mr Harvie says.

    He calls for the abolition of the Home Office if a migration system based on compassion and support is to be created.

  13. Family migration policy has 'inherent inequality'

    Labour MSP Claire Baker

    Labour MSP Claire Baker says Scotland is facing serious demographic challenges and migration will play a key role going forward.

    The UK government's policy on migration has inherent inequalities within it, she states.

    A continuation of the current approach will damage the economy and our culture, Ms Baker warns.

    The Labour MSP says family reunification is beyond the means of many families and calls for the income cap approach to change.

    Family migrants are more likely to stay than other groups and Scotland needs this, she adds.

  14. Background: Scotland's spring birth rate hits record low

    Possible reasons for the lower number of births include economic uncertainty influencing parenting choices
    Image caption: Possible reasons for the lower number of births include economic uncertainty influencing parenting choices

    Scotland's spring birth rate fell to its lowest level since records began, according to the most recent figures.

    Provisional statistics show 12,253 births were registered in the second quarter of 2019 - 5.4% lower than 2018.

    It is the lowest number recorded between April and June since registration began in 1855.

    Scotland's population stands at 5.4m, the highest it has ever been, but the Scottish government said it faced "distinct challenges".